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Anaerobic Capacityestimated in A Single Supramaximal Test in Cycling: Validity and Reliability Analysis

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aim was to verify the validity (i.e., study A) and reliability (i.e., study B) of the alternative maximal accumulated oxygen deficit determined using onlya supramaximal effort (MAODALT)to estimate anaerobic capacity [i.e., estimated by the gold standard maximal accumulated oxygen deficit method (MAOD)] during cycling. In study A, the effects of supramaximal intensities on MAODALT and the comparison with the MAOD were investigated in fourteen active subjects (26 ± 6 years). In study B, the test-retest reliability was investigated, where fourteen male amateur cyclists (29 ± 5 years) performed the MAODALT twice at 115% of the intensity associated to maximal oxygen uptake (). MAODALT determined at 130 and 150% of was lower than MAOD (p ≤ 0.048), but no differences between MAODALT determined at 100, 105, 110, 115, 120 and 140% of (3.58 ± 0.53L; 3.58 ± 0.59L; 3.53 ± 0.52L; 3.48 ± 0.72L; 3.52 ± 0.61L and 3.46 ± 0.69L, respectively) with MAOD (3.99 ± 0.64L). The MAODALT determined from the intensities between 110 and 120% of presented the better agreement and concordance with MAOD. In the test-retest, the MAODALT was not different (p > 0.05), showed high reproducibility when expressed in absolute values (ICC = 0.96, p < 0.01), and a good level of agreement in the Bland-Altman plot analysis (mean differences ± CI95%:−0.16 ± 0.53L). Thus, the MAODALT seems to be valid and reliable to assess anaerobic capacity in cycling.

No MeSH data available.


Supramaximal oxygen uptake () estimated at 110% of the intensity associated with the maximal oxygen uptake () (A) and the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) (B).
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f3: Supramaximal oxygen uptake () estimated at 110% of the intensity associated with the maximal oxygen uptake () (A) and the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) (B).

Mentions: Initially, the linear regression was constructed from the relationship between the submaximal efforts and respective . The y-intercept was fixed with the mean of baseline values (rest) (Fig. 3A)35. The of each exercise intensity was assumed as the mean of the final two minutes of exercise2. To estimate the supramaximal energetic demand, the linear regression was constructed to minimize possible effects related to the number of submaximal efforts, a fixed y-intercept and the non-linearity caused by the slow component of the when exercise intensities above the anaerobic threshold were included2.


Anaerobic Capacityestimated in A Single Supramaximal Test in Cycling: Validity and Reliability Analysis
Supramaximal oxygen uptake () estimated at 110% of the intensity associated with the maximal oxygen uptake () (A) and the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) (B).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304204&req=5

f3: Supramaximal oxygen uptake () estimated at 110% of the intensity associated with the maximal oxygen uptake () (A) and the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) (B).
Mentions: Initially, the linear regression was constructed from the relationship between the submaximal efforts and respective . The y-intercept was fixed with the mean of baseline values (rest) (Fig. 3A)35. The of each exercise intensity was assumed as the mean of the final two minutes of exercise2. To estimate the supramaximal energetic demand, the linear regression was constructed to minimize possible effects related to the number of submaximal efforts, a fixed y-intercept and the non-linearity caused by the slow component of the when exercise intensities above the anaerobic threshold were included2.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aim was to verify the validity (i.e., study A) and reliability (i.e., study B) of the alternative maximal accumulated oxygen deficit determined using onlya supramaximal effort (MAODALT)to estimate anaerobic capacity [i.e., estimated by the gold standard maximal accumulated oxygen deficit method (MAOD)] during cycling. In study A, the effects of supramaximal intensities on MAODALT and the comparison with the MAOD were investigated in fourteen active subjects (26 ± 6 years). In study B, the test-retest reliability was investigated, where fourteen male amateur cyclists (29 ± 5 years) performed the MAODALT twice at 115% of the intensity associated to maximal oxygen uptake (). MAODALT determined at 130 and 150% of was lower than MAOD (p ≤ 0.048), but no differences between MAODALT determined at 100, 105, 110, 115, 120 and 140% of (3.58 ± 0.53L; 3.58 ± 0.59L; 3.53 ± 0.52L; 3.48 ± 0.72L; 3.52 ± 0.61L and 3.46 ± 0.69L, respectively) with MAOD (3.99 ± 0.64L). The MAODALT determined from the intensities between 110 and 120% of presented the better agreement and concordance with MAOD. In the test-retest, the MAODALT was not different (p > 0.05), showed high reproducibility when expressed in absolute values (ICC = 0.96, p < 0.01), and a good level of agreement in the Bland-Altman plot analysis (mean differences ± CI95%:−0.16 ± 0.53L). Thus, the MAODALT seems to be valid and reliable to assess anaerobic capacity in cycling.

No MeSH data available.