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Snapshot linear-Stokes imaging spectropolarimeter using division-of-focal-plane polarimetry and integral field spectroscopy

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In this paper, the design and experimental demonstration of a snapshot linear-Stokes imaging spectropolarimeter (SLSIS) is presented. The SLSIS, which is based on division-of-focal-plane polarimetry with four parallel linear polarization channels and integral field spectroscopy with numerous slit dispersive paths, has no moving parts and provides video-rate Stokes-vector hyperspectral datacubes. It does not need any scanning in the spectral, spatial or polarization dimension and offers significant advantages of rapid reconstruction without heavy computation during post-processing. The principle and the experimental setup of the SLSIS are described in detail. The image registration, Stokes spectral reconstruction and calibration procedures are included, and the system is validated using measurements of tungsten light and a static scene. The SLSIS’s snapshot ability to resolve polarization spectral signatures is demonstrated using measurements of a dynamic scene.

No MeSH data available.


Experimental setup.
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f4: Experimental setup.

Mentions: Figure 4 shows the experimental setup. The objective and collimator are achromatic doublets with a focal length of 250 mm and a diameter of 40 mm. The imaging lens has a focal length of 50 mm and a F/# of 5.6 (FUJINON CF50HA-1). A field lens with a focal length of 195 mm is used to increase the light efficiency. The spectral range of the system is limited to 450–650 nm with a bandpass filter (Semrock FF01-550/2000-25). Since the dispersed spectra L = 518 μm covers 35 macro pixels, the nominal spectral resolution would be 5.7 nm. The spectral resolution would decrease with the increase of wavelength due to nonlinear dispersion. An external trigger (NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS BNC-2110) is used to control the PolarCam and the RGB camera to simultaneously acquire images. The RGB camera is the Flea3 USB 3.0 digital camera (Point Grey FL3-U3-13S2C-CS) with a full resolution of 1328 (H) × 1048 (V) and the pixel size of 3.63 μm × 3.63 μm. The focal lengths of the CS-mount lens is 25 mm with a F/# of 5.6 (EDMUND Optics 67715 VIS - NIR).


Snapshot linear-Stokes imaging spectropolarimeter using division-of-focal-plane polarimetry and integral field spectroscopy
Experimental setup.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304160&req=5

f4: Experimental setup.
Mentions: Figure 4 shows the experimental setup. The objective and collimator are achromatic doublets with a focal length of 250 mm and a diameter of 40 mm. The imaging lens has a focal length of 50 mm and a F/# of 5.6 (FUJINON CF50HA-1). A field lens with a focal length of 195 mm is used to increase the light efficiency. The spectral range of the system is limited to 450–650 nm with a bandpass filter (Semrock FF01-550/2000-25). Since the dispersed spectra L = 518 μm covers 35 macro pixels, the nominal spectral resolution would be 5.7 nm. The spectral resolution would decrease with the increase of wavelength due to nonlinear dispersion. An external trigger (NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS BNC-2110) is used to control the PolarCam and the RGB camera to simultaneously acquire images. The RGB camera is the Flea3 USB 3.0 digital camera (Point Grey FL3-U3-13S2C-CS) with a full resolution of 1328 (H) × 1048 (V) and the pixel size of 3.63 μm × 3.63 μm. The focal lengths of the CS-mount lens is 25 mm with a F/# of 5.6 (EDMUND Optics 67715 VIS - NIR).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In this paper, the design and experimental demonstration of a snapshot linear-Stokes imaging spectropolarimeter (SLSIS) is presented. The SLSIS, which is based on division-of-focal-plane polarimetry with four parallel linear polarization channels and integral field spectroscopy with numerous slit dispersive paths, has no moving parts and provides video-rate Stokes-vector hyperspectral datacubes. It does not need any scanning in the spectral, spatial or polarization dimension and offers significant advantages of rapid reconstruction without heavy computation during post-processing. The principle and the experimental setup of the SLSIS are described in detail. The image registration, Stokes spectral reconstruction and calibration procedures are included, and the system is validated using measurements of tungsten light and a static scene. The SLSIS’s snapshot ability to resolve polarization spectral signatures is demonstrated using measurements of a dynamic scene.

No MeSH data available.