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Corrosion resistance of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on copper

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ABSTRACT

Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a layered material with high thermal and chemical stability ideal for ultrathin corrosion resistant coatings. Here, we report the corrosion resistance of Cu with hBN grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that hBN layers inhibit Cu corrosion and oxygen reduction. We find that CVD grown hBN reduces the Cu corrosion rate by one order of magnitude compared to bare Cu, suggesting that this ultrathin layer can be employed as an atomically thin corrosion-inhibition coating.

No MeSH data available.


EIS results of bare Cu and hBN-Cu in a 0.1 M NaOH electrolyte solution upon application of a 10 mV sinusoidal AC potential and a DC potential of 0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl to the working electrode.(a) Bode plot of impedance magnitude of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) samples. (b) A Bode phase plot of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) samples. (c) Nyquist impedance plots of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) sample. Inset, Nyquist impedance plot of Cu.
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f3: EIS results of bare Cu and hBN-Cu in a 0.1 M NaOH electrolyte solution upon application of a 10 mV sinusoidal AC potential and a DC potential of 0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl to the working electrode.(a) Bode plot of impedance magnitude of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) samples. (b) A Bode phase plot of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) samples. (c) Nyquist impedance plots of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) sample. Inset, Nyquist impedance plot of Cu.

Mentions: The corrosion inhibition in hBN-Cu was further validated by EIS. The impedance from electrolyte to electrode versus frequency was measured by application of a 10 mV sinusoidal AC potential and a DC potential of 0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl to the working electrode, over a frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz. EIS results of bare Cu and hBN-Cu in a 0.1 M NaOH electrolyte under identical experimental condition are presented in Fig. 3. The most prominent difference between hBN-Cu and Cu is the increased electrochemical impedance of hBN-Cu versus Cu, particularly at low frequencies. A higher impedance at low frequencies is most naturally explained by an increase in charge transfer resistance as a result of the hBN layer. As shown in Fig. 3a and b, the impedance of hBN-Cu and Cu drop as frequency increases. Figure 3b shows a broad phase angle for hBN-Cu which suggests the existence of two overlapped time constants. The electrochemical impedance of graphene coated Cu typically adheres to a Randle-Warburg circuit model13. However, the Nyquist plots of both hBN-Cu and Cu samples (Fig. 3c) do not display the expected impedance semicircle at high frequency and the linear region with 45° slope at low frequency. Qualitatively, the impedance drops at high frequency as the capacitive impedance of the electrolyte-electrode interfaces, including the hBN layer itself, become more effective at shunting the charge transfer resistances. A more complex circuit model is required to accurately model the measured EIS results, and further studies are required in this regard.


Corrosion resistance of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on copper
EIS results of bare Cu and hBN-Cu in a 0.1 M NaOH electrolyte solution upon application of a 10 mV sinusoidal AC potential and a DC potential of 0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl to the working electrode.(a) Bode plot of impedance magnitude of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) samples. (b) A Bode phase plot of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) samples. (c) Nyquist impedance plots of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) sample. Inset, Nyquist impedance plot of Cu.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5304158&req=5

f3: EIS results of bare Cu and hBN-Cu in a 0.1 M NaOH electrolyte solution upon application of a 10 mV sinusoidal AC potential and a DC potential of 0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl to the working electrode.(a) Bode plot of impedance magnitude of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) samples. (b) A Bode phase plot of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) samples. (c) Nyquist impedance plots of Cu (red) and hBN-Cu (blue) sample. Inset, Nyquist impedance plot of Cu.
Mentions: The corrosion inhibition in hBN-Cu was further validated by EIS. The impedance from electrolyte to electrode versus frequency was measured by application of a 10 mV sinusoidal AC potential and a DC potential of 0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl to the working electrode, over a frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz. EIS results of bare Cu and hBN-Cu in a 0.1 M NaOH electrolyte under identical experimental condition are presented in Fig. 3. The most prominent difference between hBN-Cu and Cu is the increased electrochemical impedance of hBN-Cu versus Cu, particularly at low frequencies. A higher impedance at low frequencies is most naturally explained by an increase in charge transfer resistance as a result of the hBN layer. As shown in Fig. 3a and b, the impedance of hBN-Cu and Cu drop as frequency increases. Figure 3b shows a broad phase angle for hBN-Cu which suggests the existence of two overlapped time constants. The electrochemical impedance of graphene coated Cu typically adheres to a Randle-Warburg circuit model13. However, the Nyquist plots of both hBN-Cu and Cu samples (Fig. 3c) do not display the expected impedance semicircle at high frequency and the linear region with 45° slope at low frequency. Qualitatively, the impedance drops at high frequency as the capacitive impedance of the electrolyte-electrode interfaces, including the hBN layer itself, become more effective at shunting the charge transfer resistances. A more complex circuit model is required to accurately model the measured EIS results, and further studies are required in this regard.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a layered material with high thermal and chemical stability ideal for ultrathin corrosion resistant coatings. Here, we report the corrosion resistance of Cu with hBN grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that hBN layers inhibit Cu corrosion and oxygen reduction. We find that CVD grown hBN reduces the Cu corrosion rate by one order of magnitude compared to bare Cu, suggesting that this ultrathin layer can be employed as an atomically thin corrosion-inhibition coating.

No MeSH data available.