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External and Internal Barriers to Studying Can Affect Student Success and Retention in a Diverse Classroom

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Although a majority of under-represented minority (URM) students begin their postsecondary education at community colleges, little is known about barriers to success and retention for transfer-bound science students. This study focuses on some of the barriers that affect these students’ ability to study adequately for a community college “gateway” course. It tests whether instructors’ expectations of study time were realistic for community college students and whether students reported facing external barriers, such as job and family responsibilities, or internal barriers to studying, such as lack of motivational, cognitive, and metacognitive abilities, all of which have been shown to impact academic success and retention. It also tests whether students who faced such barriers were less likely to succeed in and complete the course, as well as whether time spent studying was related to course success. The findings reported here show that community college students do not have enough available time to study and that external and internal barriers are both prevalent among these students. In addition, students who faced such barriers are more likely to fail or drop the class. Results also show that study time is positively correlated with retention, but not performance, as well as with some motivational, cognitive, and metacognitive dimensions of self-regulated learning. These findings lead to new questions, including whether student success in a community college class is associated with the use of cognitive and metacognitive learning strategies for students with no prior degrees, and whether increased course structure may improve success for college students with lower self-regulated abilities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study time and course success. Study time is related to retention but not to success in the class. Percent Pass (P), Fail (F), and Withdrawal (W) rates according to reported study times. P: passed the course with a C or above (black bars); F: failed the course (D or F, grey bars); W: dropped before the 12th week of class (white bars). Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient: −0.032, p = 0.745, n = 108.
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f3-jmbe-17-351: Study time and course success. Study time is related to retention but not to success in the class. Percent Pass (P), Fail (F), and Withdrawal (W) rates according to reported study times. P: passed the course with a C or above (black bars); F: failed the course (D or F, grey bars); W: dropped before the 12th week of class (white bars). Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient: −0.032, p = 0.745, n = 108.

Mentions: This study also asked whether study time was related to academic achievement for this population of students. There were no significant differences in average percent grade or distribution of grades on the first exam based on reported study time (data not shown). Additionally, there was no correlation between final course letter grade or retention in the course and reported study time (Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient: 0.011, p = 0.907, n = 108), or between pass rates and study time (Fig. 3; < 2 hours, pass rate (P) = 61%; 2–4 hours, P = 44%; 5–7 hours, P = 67%; > 7 hours, P = 63%), indicating that study time was not related to course success.


External and Internal Barriers to Studying Can Affect Student Success and Retention in a Diverse Classroom
Study time and course success. Study time is related to retention but not to success in the class. Percent Pass (P), Fail (F), and Withdrawal (W) rates according to reported study times. P: passed the course with a C or above (black bars); F: failed the course (D or F, grey bars); W: dropped before the 12th week of class (white bars). Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient: −0.032, p = 0.745, n = 108.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5134938&req=5

f3-jmbe-17-351: Study time and course success. Study time is related to retention but not to success in the class. Percent Pass (P), Fail (F), and Withdrawal (W) rates according to reported study times. P: passed the course with a C or above (black bars); F: failed the course (D or F, grey bars); W: dropped before the 12th week of class (white bars). Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient: −0.032, p = 0.745, n = 108.
Mentions: This study also asked whether study time was related to academic achievement for this population of students. There were no significant differences in average percent grade or distribution of grades on the first exam based on reported study time (data not shown). Additionally, there was no correlation between final course letter grade or retention in the course and reported study time (Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient: 0.011, p = 0.907, n = 108), or between pass rates and study time (Fig. 3; < 2 hours, pass rate (P) = 61%; 2–4 hours, P = 44%; 5–7 hours, P = 67%; > 7 hours, P = 63%), indicating that study time was not related to course success.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Although a majority of under-represented minority (URM) students begin their postsecondary education at community colleges, little is known about barriers to success and retention for transfer-bound science students. This study focuses on some of the barriers that affect these students&rsquo; ability to study adequately for a community college &ldquo;gateway&rdquo; course. It tests whether instructors&rsquo; expectations of study time were realistic for community college students and whether students reported facing external barriers, such as job and family responsibilities, or internal barriers to studying, such as lack of motivational, cognitive, and metacognitive abilities, all of which have been shown to impact academic success and retention. It also tests whether students who faced such barriers were less likely to succeed in and complete the course, as well as whether time spent studying was related to course success. The findings reported here show that community college students do not have enough available time to study and that external and internal barriers are both prevalent among these students. In addition, students who faced such barriers are more likely to fail or drop the class. Results also show that study time is positively correlated with retention, but not performance, as well as with some motivational, cognitive, and metacognitive dimensions of self-regulated learning. These findings lead to new questions, including whether student success in a community college class is associated with the use of cognitive and metacognitive learning strategies for students with no prior degrees, and whether increased course structure may improve success for college students with lower self-regulated abilities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus