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Safety comparison of four types of rabies vaccines in patients with WHO category II animal exposure

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the safeties of 4 types of rabies vaccines for patients with WHO category II animal exposure, especially in different age groups.

A total of 4000 patients with WHO category II animal exposure were randomly divided into 4 vaccine groups, and were respectively given with Vaccines A, B, C, and D. And subjects in each vaccine group were divided into 4 age groups (≤5, 5–18, 19–60, and ≥60-year-old groups). Then adverse events (including local and systemic ones) were recorded and compared. Consequently, except for Vaccine B, patients under the age of 5 in Groups A, C, and D suffered from more adverse reactions than those in other age groups. Furthermore, for the children aged less than 5 years, incidence of adverse events following administration of Vaccine B, with the dose of 0.5 mL and production of bioreactor systems, was significantly lower than Vaccines A and D.

Our data showed that rabies vaccines with smaller doses and more advanced processing techniques are of relatively high safety for the patients, especially for the young children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of AEs of children under the age of 5 among 4 vaccine groups. “∗” means that incidence ratio of total AEs in Group B was much lower than that in Groups A and D (both of P values <0.001); “∗∗” means that incidence ratio of local AEs in Group B was much lower than that in Groups A and D (P = 0.004, <0.001 respectively). AEs = adverse events.
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Figure 3: Comparison of AEs of children under the age of 5 among 4 vaccine groups. “∗” means that incidence ratio of total AEs in Group B was much lower than that in Groups A and D (both of P values <0.001); “∗∗” means that incidence ratio of local AEs in Group B was much lower than that in Groups A and D (P = 0.004, <0.001 respectively). AEs = adverse events.

Mentions: Based on the findings above, we focused on adverse reactions of children under the age of 5. As a result, incidence of total AEs in Group B (35.09%) decreased significantly compared with Groups A (57.24%) and D (59.89%). Nevertheless, there was no statistical difference in incidence of Groups B (35.09%) and C (41.80%). Furthermore, systemic and local reactions were respectively recorded and compared. Compared with Groups A (42.77%) and D (44.07%), incidence of local AEs in Group B (27.49%) was significantly decreased, yet which was not statistically different from that in Group C (31.22%). Besides, there was no difference in incidence of systemic AEs among the 4 groups (seen in Table 3 and Fig. 3). More specifically, diverse local and systemic adverse reactions were observed and compared. As for systemic AEs (fever, allergy, etc), there was no significant difference in incidence of any specific adverse reaction among 4 vaccine groups. However, incidence of local pain in Group B (15.79%) was significantly lower than that in Group A (30.82%). Simultaneously, Vaccine B (4.09%) was found to result in much less indurations compared with Vaccine D (11.86%) (seen in Table 4 and Fig. 4).


Safety comparison of four types of rabies vaccines in patients with WHO category II animal exposure
Comparison of AEs of children under the age of 5 among 4 vaccine groups. “∗” means that incidence ratio of total AEs in Group B was much lower than that in Groups A and D (both of P values <0.001); “∗∗” means that incidence ratio of local AEs in Group B was much lower than that in Groups A and D (P = 0.004, <0.001 respectively). AEs = adverse events.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5134847&req=5

Figure 3: Comparison of AEs of children under the age of 5 among 4 vaccine groups. “∗” means that incidence ratio of total AEs in Group B was much lower than that in Groups A and D (both of P values <0.001); “∗∗” means that incidence ratio of local AEs in Group B was much lower than that in Groups A and D (P = 0.004, <0.001 respectively). AEs = adverse events.
Mentions: Based on the findings above, we focused on adverse reactions of children under the age of 5. As a result, incidence of total AEs in Group B (35.09%) decreased significantly compared with Groups A (57.24%) and D (59.89%). Nevertheless, there was no statistical difference in incidence of Groups B (35.09%) and C (41.80%). Furthermore, systemic and local reactions were respectively recorded and compared. Compared with Groups A (42.77%) and D (44.07%), incidence of local AEs in Group B (27.49%) was significantly decreased, yet which was not statistically different from that in Group C (31.22%). Besides, there was no difference in incidence of systemic AEs among the 4 groups (seen in Table 3 and Fig. 3). More specifically, diverse local and systemic adverse reactions were observed and compared. As for systemic AEs (fever, allergy, etc), there was no significant difference in incidence of any specific adverse reaction among 4 vaccine groups. However, incidence of local pain in Group B (15.79%) was significantly lower than that in Group A (30.82%). Simultaneously, Vaccine B (4.09%) was found to result in much less indurations compared with Vaccine D (11.86%) (seen in Table 4 and Fig. 4).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the safeties of 4 types of rabies vaccines for patients with WHO category II animal exposure, especially in different age groups.

A total of 4000 patients with WHO category II animal exposure were randomly divided into 4 vaccine groups, and were respectively given with Vaccines A, B, C, and D. And subjects in each vaccine group were divided into 4 age groups (&le;5, 5&ndash;18, 19&ndash;60, and &ge;60-year-old groups). Then adverse events (including local and systemic ones) were recorded and compared. Consequently, except for Vaccine B, patients under the age of 5 in Groups A, C, and D suffered from more adverse reactions than those in other age groups. Furthermore, for the children aged less than 5 years, incidence of adverse events following administration of Vaccine B, with the dose of 0.5&#8202;mL and production of bioreactor systems, was significantly lower than Vaccines A and D.

Our data showed that rabies vaccines with smaller doses and more advanced processing techniques are of relatively high safety for the patients, especially for the young children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus