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Angiosarcoma in the chest: radiologic – pathologic correlation

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ABSTRACT

Rationale:: Angiosarcomas are rare, malignant vascular tumors.

Patient concerns:: They represents about 2% of all soft tissue sarcoma, which can often metastasize through the hematogenous route. The radiological features have been analyzed in 4 patients with metastatic angiosarcoma in the chest.

Diagnoses:: The main radiologic findings included nodules, cysts, nodules with halo sign, and vascular tree-in-bud. Morphologic features, as observed in the histologic specimen, have been correlated with radiologic appearance.

Lessons:: Metastatic angiosarcomas to the lung are characterized by a wide variety of radiologic appearances that can be very characteristic. Computed tomographic findings observed include bilateral solid nodules, cystic, and bullous lesions sometimes associated with spontaneous hemopneumothoraces.

No MeSH data available.


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Patient 2. CT scan 2 months after the evidence of pulmonary progression shows the increase of pulmonary nodules, bilateral pleural effusion and wide ground glass attenuation, mainly in the right upper lobe.
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Figure 7: Patient 2. CT scan 2 months after the evidence of pulmonary progression shows the increase of pulmonary nodules, bilateral pleural effusion and wide ground glass attenuation, mainly in the right upper lobe.

Mentions: One year later, 3 years after initial diagnosis, the patient showed multiple new bilateral pulmonary nodules with halo sign, measuring 8 to 15 mm in size consistent with metastases (Fig. 6). Two months later, he developed a severe worsening of respiratory symptoms and repeated CT angiography of the chest to exclude PE. Multiple areas of diffuse interlobular septal thickening were in association of crazy paving pattern related to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (Fig. 7).


Angiosarcoma in the chest: radiologic – pathologic correlation
Patient 2. CT scan 2 months after the evidence of pulmonary progression shows the increase of pulmonary nodules, bilateral pleural effusion and wide ground glass attenuation, mainly in the right upper lobe.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5134813&req=5

Figure 7: Patient 2. CT scan 2 months after the evidence of pulmonary progression shows the increase of pulmonary nodules, bilateral pleural effusion and wide ground glass attenuation, mainly in the right upper lobe.
Mentions: One year later, 3 years after initial diagnosis, the patient showed multiple new bilateral pulmonary nodules with halo sign, measuring 8 to 15 mm in size consistent with metastases (Fig. 6). Two months later, he developed a severe worsening of respiratory symptoms and repeated CT angiography of the chest to exclude PE. Multiple areas of diffuse interlobular septal thickening were in association of crazy paving pattern related to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (Fig. 7).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Rationale:: Angiosarcomas are rare, malignant vascular tumors.

Patient concerns:: They represents about 2% of all soft tissue sarcoma, which can often metastasize through the hematogenous route. The radiological features have been analyzed in 4 patients with metastatic angiosarcoma in the chest.

Diagnoses:: The main radiologic findings included nodules, cysts, nodules with halo sign, and vascular tree-in-bud. Morphologic features, as observed in the histologic specimen, have been correlated with radiologic appearance.

Lessons:: Metastatic angiosarcomas to the lung are characterized by a wide variety of radiologic appearances that can be very characteristic. Computed tomographic findings observed include bilateral solid nodules, cystic, and bullous lesions sometimes associated with spontaneous hemopneumothoraces.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus