Limits...
Medial and Lateral Discoid Menisci of Both Knees

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Discoid menisci on both the medial and lateral sides are rare, and there are very few reports on cases involving both sides. We report a case of a 52-year-old female with medial and lateral discoid menisci in both knees. Arthroscopy revealed the lateral menisci of both knees were complete discoid menisci, and partial meniscectomy was performed. The medial menisci were incomplete discoid menisci, but there were no findings of abnormal mobility or injury; therefore, the medial menisci were observed without treatment. At six months postoperatively, her pain and range of motion restrictions disappeared.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed the medial menisci of both knees were incomplete discoid menisci with a high intensity area in the posterior section (arrowheads). The lateral menisci were complete discoid menisci with a horizontal high intensity area (arrows). R: right, L: left.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5134786&req=5

f3-ksrr-28-330: T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed the medial menisci of both knees were incomplete discoid menisci with a high intensity area in the posterior section (arrowheads). The lateral menisci were complete discoid menisci with a horizontal high intensity area (arrows). R: right, L: left.

Mentions: A 52-year-old female experienced right knee joint pain when going up and down stairs one month prior to her presentation to a clinic. Examination by a local doctor and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resulted in a diagnosis of lateral meniscus injury. She was treated conservatively for 2 months, but the pain was not alleviated, and her left knee joint also became painful so she was referred to our hospital immediately. Examination at our department showed a restriction in knee joint range of motion (ROM), with right knee extension −15° and flexion 125° and left knee extension −10° and flexion 135°. Tenderness was present in the lateral femorotibial joint spaces of both knees, and clicking was palpated during flexion. The McMurray test also revealed lateral pain and clicking in both knees. There were no indirect signs of discoid lateral meniscus such as lateral joint space widening, squaring of the lateral femoral condyle, high fibular head, or hypoplasia of the lateral tibial plateau in plain radiographs (Fig. 1). Full-length frontal plain radiographs of the legs showed hypoplasia of the femoral lateral condyle and varus deformity of the articular surface of the proximal tibia. The femorotibial angle was 176° on the right side and 177° on the left side. The mechanical lateral distal femoral angle was 83° on the right side and 80° on the left side. The medial proximal tibial angle was 80° on the right side and 77° on the left side. Both Mikulicz lines were slightly displaced inwardly (Fig. 2)4). T2-weighted MRI showed that the medial menisci in both knees were incomplete discoid menisci, and there was high intensity in the posterior section. T2-weighted MRI of the lateral menisci in both knees showed complete discoid menisci and a horizontal high intensity area (Fig. 3). She underwent surgery immediately. Arthroscopy revealed that the lateral menisci of both knees were complete discoid menisci. Based on these findings, the patient underwent partial meniscectomy, leaving margins of about 6 mm. There was a horizontal tear from the anterior to the posterior section. The medial menisci were incomplete discoid menisci, but there were no findings of abnormal mobility or injury; therefore, and the medial menisci were observed without treatment (Fig. 4). At six months postoperatively, her pain and ROM restrictions disappeared. MRI showed no obvious changes in the medial menisci. One year and seven months postoperatively, she experienced no recurrence of pain or hydrarthrosis, and plain X-rays showed lateral femorotibial joint space narrowing (Fig. 5).


Medial and Lateral Discoid Menisci of Both Knees
T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed the medial menisci of both knees were incomplete discoid menisci with a high intensity area in the posterior section (arrowheads). The lateral menisci were complete discoid menisci with a horizontal high intensity area (arrows). R: right, L: left.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5134786&req=5

f3-ksrr-28-330: T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed the medial menisci of both knees were incomplete discoid menisci with a high intensity area in the posterior section (arrowheads). The lateral menisci were complete discoid menisci with a horizontal high intensity area (arrows). R: right, L: left.
Mentions: A 52-year-old female experienced right knee joint pain when going up and down stairs one month prior to her presentation to a clinic. Examination by a local doctor and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resulted in a diagnosis of lateral meniscus injury. She was treated conservatively for 2 months, but the pain was not alleviated, and her left knee joint also became painful so she was referred to our hospital immediately. Examination at our department showed a restriction in knee joint range of motion (ROM), with right knee extension −15° and flexion 125° and left knee extension −10° and flexion 135°. Tenderness was present in the lateral femorotibial joint spaces of both knees, and clicking was palpated during flexion. The McMurray test also revealed lateral pain and clicking in both knees. There were no indirect signs of discoid lateral meniscus such as lateral joint space widening, squaring of the lateral femoral condyle, high fibular head, or hypoplasia of the lateral tibial plateau in plain radiographs (Fig. 1). Full-length frontal plain radiographs of the legs showed hypoplasia of the femoral lateral condyle and varus deformity of the articular surface of the proximal tibia. The femorotibial angle was 176° on the right side and 177° on the left side. The mechanical lateral distal femoral angle was 83° on the right side and 80° on the left side. The medial proximal tibial angle was 80° on the right side and 77° on the left side. Both Mikulicz lines were slightly displaced inwardly (Fig. 2)4). T2-weighted MRI showed that the medial menisci in both knees were incomplete discoid menisci, and there was high intensity in the posterior section. T2-weighted MRI of the lateral menisci in both knees showed complete discoid menisci and a horizontal high intensity area (Fig. 3). She underwent surgery immediately. Arthroscopy revealed that the lateral menisci of both knees were complete discoid menisci. Based on these findings, the patient underwent partial meniscectomy, leaving margins of about 6 mm. There was a horizontal tear from the anterior to the posterior section. The medial menisci were incomplete discoid menisci, but there were no findings of abnormal mobility or injury; therefore, and the medial menisci were observed without treatment (Fig. 4). At six months postoperatively, her pain and ROM restrictions disappeared. MRI showed no obvious changes in the medial menisci. One year and seven months postoperatively, she experienced no recurrence of pain or hydrarthrosis, and plain X-rays showed lateral femorotibial joint space narrowing (Fig. 5).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Discoid menisci on both the medial and lateral sides are rare, and there are very few reports on cases involving both sides. We report a case of a 52-year-old female with medial and lateral discoid menisci in both knees. Arthroscopy revealed the lateral menisci of both knees were complete discoid menisci, and partial meniscectomy was performed. The medial menisci were incomplete discoid menisci, but there were no findings of abnormal mobility or injury; therefore, the medial menisci were observed without treatment. At six months postoperatively, her pain and range of motion restrictions disappeared.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus