Limits...
Distribution and patterning of non-communicable disease risk factors in indigenous Mbororo and non-autochthonous populations in Cameroon: cross sectional study

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Data on Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) among indigenous populations are needed for interventions to improve health care. We conducted a survey in 2013 among rural indigenous Mbororo, Fulbe and other ethnic groups to determine the distribution of risk factors of NCDs in Cameroon.

Methods: We selected seven targets of NCD risk factors: tobacco use, alcohol use, diet (salt/sugar intake, vegetable/fruit consumption), raised blood pressure, raised blood glucose, physical inactivity and weight measures. The WHO STEPwise approach was used to collect data from 1921 consenting participants aged ≥20 years. Prevalence of NCD risk factors was summarised by descriptive statistics.

Results: Underweight was widespread, Mbororo (50.8%) and Fulbe (37.2%). Increase in prevalence of six risk factors was observed among the Fulbe when compared to Mbororo. Participants aged 20–39 years had low levels of physical activity, poor diet and higher levels of alcohol consumption (except Mbororo) and those aged ≥40 years had higher prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, current smoking and overweight/obesity. Men and women differed in current smoking, occasional/daily alcohol consumption, pre-hypertension and hypertension, continuous walking for at least ten minutes, and weight measures for Fulbe and Mbororo, p < 0.05.

Conclusion: Distribution of NCD risk factors was high among settled Fulani (Fulbe) when compared to indigenous nomadic Fulani (Mbororo). Change from nomadic to settled life might be accompanied by higher prevalence of NCDs. This data should be used to develop intervention programmes to curb the rising burden of NCDs in rural indigenous and non-indigenous populations.

No MeSH data available.


Percentage Distribution and Patterning of NCD Risk Factors by Age Group, 2013
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121965&req=5

Fig2: Percentage Distribution and Patterning of NCD Risk Factors by Age Group, 2013

Mentions: A total of 814 households and 1921 participants aged ≥20 years were included in data analysis. Mean age of participants was 36.1 ± 14.4 (CI:35.4-36.7) years. The proportion of females was higher and the age group 20–29 years most represented. Questionnaires were often administered in the local Fulfulde language to Fulani. Mbororo households were the most crowded and the Mbororo were the recent arrivals at present site. About three quarters of Mbororo had annual income of less than USD 200 as compared to about two thirds of Fulbe and general population (Table 1). The Mbororo were the least educated (17.8%). Socio-demographic, health, lifestyle and family history characteristics by ethnic group are shown in Table 2. Table 3 shows variables with statistical significant differences between ethnic groups after post hoc test. Table 4 shows age and sex standardized prevalence of cardio metabolic risk factors by ethnicity and gender. Figure 1 shows cumulative percentage distribution of NCD risk factors and Fig. 2 percentage distribution by age interval in Fulbe, Mbororo, general population and pooled data.Table 1


Distribution and patterning of non-communicable disease risk factors in indigenous Mbororo and non-autochthonous populations in Cameroon: cross sectional study
Percentage Distribution and Patterning of NCD Risk Factors by Age Group, 2013
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121965&req=5

Fig2: Percentage Distribution and Patterning of NCD Risk Factors by Age Group, 2013
Mentions: A total of 814 households and 1921 participants aged ≥20 years were included in data analysis. Mean age of participants was 36.1 ± 14.4 (CI:35.4-36.7) years. The proportion of females was higher and the age group 20–29 years most represented. Questionnaires were often administered in the local Fulfulde language to Fulani. Mbororo households were the most crowded and the Mbororo were the recent arrivals at present site. About three quarters of Mbororo had annual income of less than USD 200 as compared to about two thirds of Fulbe and general population (Table 1). The Mbororo were the least educated (17.8%). Socio-demographic, health, lifestyle and family history characteristics by ethnic group are shown in Table 2. Table 3 shows variables with statistical significant differences between ethnic groups after post hoc test. Table 4 shows age and sex standardized prevalence of cardio metabolic risk factors by ethnicity and gender. Figure 1 shows cumulative percentage distribution of NCD risk factors and Fig. 2 percentage distribution by age interval in Fulbe, Mbororo, general population and pooled data.Table 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Data on Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) among indigenous populations are needed for interventions to improve health care. We conducted a survey in 2013 among rural indigenous Mbororo, Fulbe and other ethnic groups to determine the distribution of risk factors of NCDs in Cameroon.

Methods: We selected seven targets of NCD risk factors: tobacco use, alcohol use, diet (salt/sugar intake, vegetable/fruit consumption), raised blood pressure, raised blood glucose, physical inactivity and weight measures. The WHO STEPwise approach was used to collect data from 1921 consenting participants aged ≥20 years. Prevalence of NCD risk factors was summarised by descriptive statistics.

Results: Underweight was widespread, Mbororo (50.8%) and Fulbe (37.2%). Increase in prevalence of six risk factors was observed among the Fulbe when compared to Mbororo. Participants aged 20–39 years had low levels of physical activity, poor diet and higher levels of alcohol consumption (except Mbororo) and those aged ≥40 years had higher prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, current smoking and overweight/obesity. Men and women differed in current smoking, occasional/daily alcohol consumption, pre-hypertension and hypertension, continuous walking for at least ten minutes, and weight measures for Fulbe and Mbororo, p < 0.05.

Conclusion: Distribution of NCD risk factors was high among settled Fulani (Fulbe) when compared to indigenous nomadic Fulani (Mbororo). Change from nomadic to settled life might be accompanied by higher prevalence of NCDs. This data should be used to develop intervention programmes to curb the rising burden of NCDs in rural indigenous and non-indigenous populations.

No MeSH data available.