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“ Cerebellar contribution to visuo-attentional alpha rhythm: insights from weightlessness ”

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Human brain adaptation in weightlessness follows the necessity to reshape the dynamic integration of the neural information acquired in the new environment. This basic aspect was here studied by the electroencephalogram (EEG) dynamics where oscillatory modulations were measured during a visuo-attentional state preceding a visuo-motor docking task. Astronauts in microgravity conducted the experiment in free-floating aboard the International Space Station, before the space flight and afterwards. We observed stronger power decrease (~ERD: event related desynchronization) of the ~10 Hz oscillation from the occipital-parietal (alpha ERD) to the central areas (mu ERD). Inverse source modelling of the stronger alpha ERD revealed a shift from the posterior cingulate cortex (BA31, from the default mode network) on Earth to the precentral cortex (BA4, primary motor cortex) in weightlessness. We also observed significant contribution of the vestibular network (BA40, BA32, and BA39) and cerebellum (lobule V, VI). We suggest that due to the high demands for the continuous readjustment of an appropriate body posture in free-floating, this visuo-attentional state required more contribution from the motor cortex. The cerebellum and the vestibular network involvement in weightlessness might support the correction signals processing necessary for postural stabilization, and the increased demand to integrate incongruent vestibular information.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Alpha-mu ERD brain sources particular to weightlessness (“W”) condition.Nonparametric statistical maps of the alpha ERD sources characterising the weightlessness (“W”) contextual brain state. This was obtained by determining which sources were significantly more active in this condition with respect to each of the three others conditions performed on the ground (“W” > “Earthbefore”; “W” > “Earthafter-early” and “W” > “Earthafter-late”) during the visuo-attentional period. Note robust cerebellar activation in the three comparisons.
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f4: Alpha-mu ERD brain sources particular to weightlessness (“W”) condition.Nonparametric statistical maps of the alpha ERD sources characterising the weightlessness (“W”) contextual brain state. This was obtained by determining which sources were significantly more active in this condition with respect to each of the three others conditions performed on the ground (“W” > “Earthbefore”; “W” > “Earthafter-early” and “W” > “Earthafter-late”) during the visuo-attentional period. Note robust cerebellar activation in the three comparisons.

Mentions: Figure 4 presents nonparametric statistical maps of the alpha ERD sources that characterize the brain state in the context of weightlessness (“W”). These were obtained by determining which sources were significantly more active in this condition with respect to each of the three other conditions observed/measured on the ground (“W” > “Earthbefore”; “W” > “Earthafter-early” and “W” > “Earthafter-late”) during the visuo-attentional period. The maxima of the alpha ERD in the “W” > “Earthbefore” condition were localized in the anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 32, left cerebrum, −17.3, 10.2, 30.9), middle temporal gyrus (BA 39, left cerebrum, −33.6, −68.4, 21.4), inferior parietal lobe (right cerebrum, BA40, 46.6, −32.4, 25.8) and cerebellum (right lobule V-VI, 5.9, −57.0, −12.2). The maximum of the alpha ERD in the “W” > “Earthafter-early” condition was found in the cerebellum (right lobule V, 17.3, −46.3, −20.9), without any other equivalent maximum in the cerebral cortex. The maxima of the alpha ERD in the “W” > “Earthafter-late” condition were found in the cerebellum (left lobule VI, −32.4, −51.8, −22.6), anterior cingulate gyrus (BA32, left cerebrum, −15.3, 9.2, 31.1) and parietal lobe (BA39, left cerebrum, −36.9, −60.4, 21.3). It is important to note that alpha ERD was localized in the cerebellum during the weightlessness condition when compared to pre-flight and (early and late) post-flight conditions.


“ Cerebellar contribution to visuo-attentional alpha rhythm: insights from weightlessness ”
Alpha-mu ERD brain sources particular to weightlessness (“W”) condition.Nonparametric statistical maps of the alpha ERD sources characterising the weightlessness (“W”) contextual brain state. This was obtained by determining which sources were significantly more active in this condition with respect to each of the three others conditions performed on the ground (“W” > “Earthbefore”; “W” > “Earthafter-early” and “W” > “Earthafter-late”) during the visuo-attentional period. Note robust cerebellar activation in the three comparisons.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121637&req=5

f4: Alpha-mu ERD brain sources particular to weightlessness (“W”) condition.Nonparametric statistical maps of the alpha ERD sources characterising the weightlessness (“W”) contextual brain state. This was obtained by determining which sources were significantly more active in this condition with respect to each of the three others conditions performed on the ground (“W” > “Earthbefore”; “W” > “Earthafter-early” and “W” > “Earthafter-late”) during the visuo-attentional period. Note robust cerebellar activation in the three comparisons.
Mentions: Figure 4 presents nonparametric statistical maps of the alpha ERD sources that characterize the brain state in the context of weightlessness (“W”). These were obtained by determining which sources were significantly more active in this condition with respect to each of the three other conditions observed/measured on the ground (“W” > “Earthbefore”; “W” > “Earthafter-early” and “W” > “Earthafter-late”) during the visuo-attentional period. The maxima of the alpha ERD in the “W” > “Earthbefore” condition were localized in the anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 32, left cerebrum, −17.3, 10.2, 30.9), middle temporal gyrus (BA 39, left cerebrum, −33.6, −68.4, 21.4), inferior parietal lobe (right cerebrum, BA40, 46.6, −32.4, 25.8) and cerebellum (right lobule V-VI, 5.9, −57.0, −12.2). The maximum of the alpha ERD in the “W” > “Earthafter-early” condition was found in the cerebellum (right lobule V, 17.3, −46.3, −20.9), without any other equivalent maximum in the cerebral cortex. The maxima of the alpha ERD in the “W” > “Earthafter-late” condition were found in the cerebellum (left lobule VI, −32.4, −51.8, −22.6), anterior cingulate gyrus (BA32, left cerebrum, −15.3, 9.2, 31.1) and parietal lobe (BA39, left cerebrum, −36.9, −60.4, 21.3). It is important to note that alpha ERD was localized in the cerebellum during the weightlessness condition when compared to pre-flight and (early and late) post-flight conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Human brain adaptation in weightlessness follows the necessity to reshape the dynamic integration of the neural information acquired in the new environment. This basic aspect was here studied by the electroencephalogram (EEG) dynamics where oscillatory modulations were measured during a visuo-attentional state preceding a visuo-motor docking task. Astronauts in microgravity conducted the experiment in free-floating aboard the International Space Station, before the space flight and afterwards. We observed stronger power decrease (~ERD: event related desynchronization) of the ~10 Hz oscillation from the occipital-parietal (alpha ERD) to the central areas (mu ERD). Inverse source modelling of the stronger alpha ERD revealed a shift from the posterior cingulate cortex (BA31, from the default mode network) on Earth to the precentral cortex (BA4, primary motor cortex) in weightlessness. We also observed significant contribution of the vestibular network (BA40, BA32, and BA39) and cerebellum (lobule V, VI). We suggest that due to the high demands for the continuous readjustment of an appropriate body posture in free-floating, this visuo-attentional state required more contribution from the motor cortex. The cerebellum and the vestibular network involvement in weightlessness might support the correction signals processing necessary for postural stabilization, and the increased demand to integrate incongruent vestibular information.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus