Limits...
Spatial mapping of lichen specialized metabolites using LDI-MSI: chemical ecology issues for Ophioparma ventosa

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Imaging mass spectrometry techniques have become a powerful strategy to assess the spatial distribution of metabolites in biological systems. Based on auto-ionisability of lichen metabolites using LDI-MS, we herein image the distribution of major secondary metabolites (specialized metabolites) from the lichen Ophioparma ventosa by LDI-MSI (Mass Spectrometry Imaging). Such technologies offer tremendous opportunities to discuss the role of natural products through spatial mapping, their distribution patterns being consistent with previous chemical ecology reports. A special attention was dedicated to miriquidic acid, an unexpected molecule we first reported in Ophioparma ventosa. The analytical strategy presented herein offers new perspectives to access the sharp distribution of lichen metabolites from regular razor blade-sectioned slices.

No MeSH data available.


Longitudinal distribution of miriquidic acid in a piece of Ophioparma ventosa thallus (Tyrol sample).Piece of thallus (A). Division of a piece of thallus in small fragments (B). Rose patches refer to areas containing miriquidic acid, as revealed by TLC monitoring (C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121634&req=5

f2: Longitudinal distribution of miriquidic acid in a piece of Ophioparma ventosa thallus (Tyrol sample).Piece of thallus (A). Division of a piece of thallus in small fragments (B). Rose patches refer to areas containing miriquidic acid, as revealed by TLC monitoring (C).

Mentions: To assess whether miriquidic acid was evenly distributed in the thallus, we first checked the chemical profile of 50 random pieces of thallus from the Styria sample. Each fragment was cut into upper and lower halves to monitor their chemical content by Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) (Figure S2). These micro-analyses revealed that miriquidic acid occurs in only two of them, and when it is present, it seems confined to the lower part of the medulla. Then, the distribution of miriquidic acid was studied in the specific context of a piece of thallus taken from the Tyrol sample. For this purpose, several pieces of lichen were divided into small fragments in accordance with the areolate structure of the thallus as depicted in Fig. 2B and S3. TLC monitoring of each fragment confirmed that miriquidic acid did not occur in every fragment and it is noteworthy that the lichen fragments containing this depside appeared contiguous to one another, defining patches as displayed in Fig. 2C and S3. Once again, miriquidic acid was ascribed to the lower half of the thallus pieces. Hence, these results indicate an uneven longitudinal distribution of miriquidic acid and allowed us to select pieces of lichen containing or lacking miriquidic acid for LDI-MSI experiments.


Spatial mapping of lichen specialized metabolites using LDI-MSI: chemical ecology issues for Ophioparma ventosa
Longitudinal distribution of miriquidic acid in a piece of Ophioparma ventosa thallus (Tyrol sample).Piece of thallus (A). Division of a piece of thallus in small fragments (B). Rose patches refer to areas containing miriquidic acid, as revealed by TLC monitoring (C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121634&req=5

f2: Longitudinal distribution of miriquidic acid in a piece of Ophioparma ventosa thallus (Tyrol sample).Piece of thallus (A). Division of a piece of thallus in small fragments (B). Rose patches refer to areas containing miriquidic acid, as revealed by TLC monitoring (C).
Mentions: To assess whether miriquidic acid was evenly distributed in the thallus, we first checked the chemical profile of 50 random pieces of thallus from the Styria sample. Each fragment was cut into upper and lower halves to monitor their chemical content by Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) (Figure S2). These micro-analyses revealed that miriquidic acid occurs in only two of them, and when it is present, it seems confined to the lower part of the medulla. Then, the distribution of miriquidic acid was studied in the specific context of a piece of thallus taken from the Tyrol sample. For this purpose, several pieces of lichen were divided into small fragments in accordance with the areolate structure of the thallus as depicted in Fig. 2B and S3. TLC monitoring of each fragment confirmed that miriquidic acid did not occur in every fragment and it is noteworthy that the lichen fragments containing this depside appeared contiguous to one another, defining patches as displayed in Fig. 2C and S3. Once again, miriquidic acid was ascribed to the lower half of the thallus pieces. Hence, these results indicate an uneven longitudinal distribution of miriquidic acid and allowed us to select pieces of lichen containing or lacking miriquidic acid for LDI-MSI experiments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Imaging mass spectrometry techniques have become a powerful strategy to assess the spatial distribution of metabolites in biological systems. Based on auto-ionisability of lichen metabolites using LDI-MS, we herein image the distribution of major secondary metabolites (specialized metabolites) from the lichen Ophioparma ventosa by LDI-MSI (Mass Spectrometry Imaging). Such technologies offer tremendous opportunities to discuss the role of natural products through spatial mapping, their distribution patterns being consistent with previous chemical ecology reports. A special attention was dedicated to miriquidic acid, an unexpected molecule we first reported in Ophioparma ventosa. The analytical strategy presented herein offers new perspectives to access the sharp distribution of lichen metabolites from regular razor blade-sectioned slices.

No MeSH data available.