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Authenticity screening of stained glass windows using optical spectroscopy

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Civilized societies should safeguard their heritage as it plays an important role in community building. Moreover, past technologies often inspire new technology. Authenticity is besides conservation and restoration a key aspect in preserving our past, for example in museums when exposing showpieces. The classification of being authentic relies on an interdisciplinary approach integrating art historical and archaeological research complemented with applied research. In recent decades analytical dating tools are based on determining the raw materials used. However, the traditional applied non-portable, chemical techniques are destructive and time-consuming. Since museums oftentimes only consent to research actions which are completely non-destructive, optical spectroscopy might offer a solution. As a case-study we apply this technique on two stained glass panels for which the 14th century dating is nowadays questioned. With this research we were able to identify how simultaneous mapping of spectral signatures measured with a low cost optical spectrum analyser unveils information regarding the production period. The significance of this research extends beyond the re-dating of these panels to the 19th century as it provides an instant tool enabling immediate answering authenticity questions during the conservation process of stained glass, thereby providing the necessary data for solving deontological questions about heritage preservation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The flashed red glasses display the typical copper SPR signature with peaks at 430 and 563 nm.
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f5: The flashed red glasses display the typical copper SPR signature with peaks at 430 and 563 nm.

Mentions: Panel N°54 contains ten red panes. The characteristic copper surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak, clearly visible in the measured spectra (Fig. 5), confirms the presence of Cu0 nanoparticles. The reduced glasses show a narrow peak at 563.1 (±0.8) nm generated by the colloidal dispersion of the metallic nanocrystals in the glass and a broader spectral contribution centred at 430 nm. The latter is usually correlated with isolated Cu0 atoms in the glass31. Although all ten samples have a quite similar spectral shape, some differences in peak intensity are observed. The peak at 430 nm is most distinct for fragment 54–44 and is weaker but still clearly observable for parts 54–13, 54–19, 54–20 and 54–40. It is absent for the remaining panes. The position of the SPR peak together with the slope of the absorbance curves between 400–500 nm points out the absence of europium ions31.


Authenticity screening of stained glass windows using optical spectroscopy
The flashed red glasses display the typical copper SPR signature with peaks at 430 and 563 nm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121600&req=5

f5: The flashed red glasses display the typical copper SPR signature with peaks at 430 and 563 nm.
Mentions: Panel N°54 contains ten red panes. The characteristic copper surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak, clearly visible in the measured spectra (Fig. 5), confirms the presence of Cu0 nanoparticles. The reduced glasses show a narrow peak at 563.1 (±0.8) nm generated by the colloidal dispersion of the metallic nanocrystals in the glass and a broader spectral contribution centred at 430 nm. The latter is usually correlated with isolated Cu0 atoms in the glass31. Although all ten samples have a quite similar spectral shape, some differences in peak intensity are observed. The peak at 430 nm is most distinct for fragment 54–44 and is weaker but still clearly observable for parts 54–13, 54–19, 54–20 and 54–40. It is absent for the remaining panes. The position of the SPR peak together with the slope of the absorbance curves between 400–500 nm points out the absence of europium ions31.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Civilized societies should safeguard their heritage as it plays an important role in community building. Moreover, past technologies often inspire new technology. Authenticity is besides conservation and restoration a key aspect in preserving our past, for example in museums when exposing showpieces. The classification of being authentic relies on an interdisciplinary approach integrating art historical and archaeological research complemented with applied research. In recent decades analytical dating tools are based on determining the raw materials used. However, the traditional applied non-portable, chemical techniques are destructive and time-consuming. Since museums oftentimes only consent to research actions which are completely non-destructive, optical spectroscopy might offer a solution. As a case-study we apply this technique on two stained glass panels for which the 14th century dating is nowadays questioned. With this research we were able to identify how simultaneous mapping of spectral signatures measured with a low cost optical spectrum analyser unveils information regarding the production period. The significance of this research extends beyond the re-dating of these panels to the 19th century as it provides an instant tool enabling immediate answering authenticity questions during the conservation process of stained glass, thereby providing the necessary data for solving deontological questions about heritage preservation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus