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Fabrication of Ion-Shaped Anisotropic Nanoparticles and their Orientational Imaging by Second-Harmonic Generation Microscopy

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ion beam shaping is a novel and powerful tool to engineer nanocomposites with effective three-dimensional (3D) architectures. In particular, this technique offers the possibility to precisely control the size, shape and 3D orientation of metallic nanoparticles at the nanometer scale while keeping the particle volume constant. Here, we use swift heavy ions of xenon for irradiation in order to successfully fabricate nanocomposites consisting of anisotropic gold nanoparticle that are oriented in 3D and embedded in silica matrix. Furthermore, we investigate individual nanorods using a nonlinear optical microscope based on second-harmonic generation (SHG). A tightly focused linearly or radially-polarized laser beam is used to excite nanorods with different orientations. We demonstrate high sensitivity of the SHG response for these polarizations to the orientation of the nanorods. The SHG measurements are in excellent agreement with the results of numerical modeling based on the boundary element method.

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Experimental and numerical second-harmonic images corresponding to oriented NRs excited using focused linear and radial polarizations.(a) The four angular NR orientations, (0°, 30°, 45° and 60°) are shown in (column b1-e1). The experimental SHG intensity distributions are shown for different NR orientations using focused x-polarized LP (column b2-e2) and radial polarizations (column b4-e4). The SHG intensity is always normalized to the highest intensity observed among the two polarizations, allowing a visual comparison. The experimental (green lines) and calculated (red lines) intensity profiles for the different NR orientations using both focused x-polarized LP and radial polarizations are also shown. (Column b3-e3) and b5-e5 are calculated SHG images using focused linear (x) and radial polarizations under the same experimental conditions.
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f4: Experimental and numerical second-harmonic images corresponding to oriented NRs excited using focused linear and radial polarizations.(a) The four angular NR orientations, (0°, 30°, 45° and 60°) are shown in (column b1-e1). The experimental SHG intensity distributions are shown for different NR orientations using focused x-polarized LP (column b2-e2) and radial polarizations (column b4-e4). The SHG intensity is always normalized to the highest intensity observed among the two polarizations, allowing a visual comparison. The experimental (green lines) and calculated (red lines) intensity profiles for the different NR orientations using both focused x-polarized LP and radial polarizations are also shown. (Column b3-e3) and b5-e5 are calculated SHG images using focused linear (x) and radial polarizations under the same experimental conditions.

Mentions: Next, we focus on SHG microscopy of the individual NRs, which are representative of all the similar NRs in a given structure. However, we will consider NRs with different orientations (θ) with respect to the sample normal. As depicted in Fig. 4a four specific angular configurations for the NRs have been studied, namely 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60°. TEM cross-sectional images representing their orientations within the optical beam are shown in Fig. 4b1–e1.


Fabrication of Ion-Shaped Anisotropic Nanoparticles and their Orientational Imaging by Second-Harmonic Generation Microscopy
Experimental and numerical second-harmonic images corresponding to oriented NRs excited using focused linear and radial polarizations.(a) The four angular NR orientations, (0°, 30°, 45° and 60°) are shown in (column b1-e1). The experimental SHG intensity distributions are shown for different NR orientations using focused x-polarized LP (column b2-e2) and radial polarizations (column b4-e4). The SHG intensity is always normalized to the highest intensity observed among the two polarizations, allowing a visual comparison. The experimental (green lines) and calculated (red lines) intensity profiles for the different NR orientations using both focused x-polarized LP and radial polarizations are also shown. (Column b3-e3) and b5-e5 are calculated SHG images using focused linear (x) and radial polarizations under the same experimental conditions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121593&req=5

f4: Experimental and numerical second-harmonic images corresponding to oriented NRs excited using focused linear and radial polarizations.(a) The four angular NR orientations, (0°, 30°, 45° and 60°) are shown in (column b1-e1). The experimental SHG intensity distributions are shown for different NR orientations using focused x-polarized LP (column b2-e2) and radial polarizations (column b4-e4). The SHG intensity is always normalized to the highest intensity observed among the two polarizations, allowing a visual comparison. The experimental (green lines) and calculated (red lines) intensity profiles for the different NR orientations using both focused x-polarized LP and radial polarizations are also shown. (Column b3-e3) and b5-e5 are calculated SHG images using focused linear (x) and radial polarizations under the same experimental conditions.
Mentions: Next, we focus on SHG microscopy of the individual NRs, which are representative of all the similar NRs in a given structure. However, we will consider NRs with different orientations (θ) with respect to the sample normal. As depicted in Fig. 4a four specific angular configurations for the NRs have been studied, namely 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60°. TEM cross-sectional images representing their orientations within the optical beam are shown in Fig. 4b1–e1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ion beam shaping is a novel and powerful tool to engineer nanocomposites with effective three-dimensional (3D) architectures. In particular, this technique offers the possibility to precisely control the size, shape and 3D orientation of metallic nanoparticles at the nanometer scale while keeping the particle volume constant. Here, we use swift heavy ions of xenon for irradiation in order to successfully fabricate nanocomposites consisting of anisotropic gold nanoparticle that are oriented in 3D and embedded in silica matrix. Furthermore, we investigate individual nanorods using a nonlinear optical microscope based on second-harmonic generation (SHG). A tightly focused linearly or radially-polarized laser beam is used to excite nanorods with different orientations. We demonstrate high sensitivity of the SHG response for these polarizations to the orientation of the nanorods. The SHG measurements are in excellent agreement with the results of numerical modeling based on the boundary element method.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus