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Prevalence of overweight and malnutrition among ethnic minority children and adolescents in China, 1991 – 2010

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine the trends in prevalence of childhood overweight and malnutrition in a large Chinese ethnic minority population from 1991 to 2010. In the Chinese National Survey on Students’ Constitution and Health from 1991 to 2010, multistage stratified sampling was conducted in the series of cross-sectional studies. Participants were 7–18-year-old students randomly selected by sex and region, and included Han and 26 ethnic minorities. During the survey period, the overall prevalence of overweight increased from 5.8% to 13.5%, and malnutrition trend increased from 3.6% to 4.1% in ethnic minority children and adolescents. Moreover, Korean and Mongol children were more likely than Han children to be obese (Korean: RR = 1.52; 95% CI: 1.48–1.56; Mongol: RR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.20–1.28). Among these minorities, the Dongxiang and Li children were more likely to be malnourished (Li: RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.37–1.57; Dongxiang: RR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.34–1.58). Shui, Khalkhas, Lisu, and Monguor children were less likely to be overweight and malnourished compared with the Hans. The prevalence of overweight among ethnicities increased yearly while that for malnutrition has fluctuated over the past few decades.

No MeSH data available.


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Prevalence of overweight/malnutrition among minority groups by age group from 1991 to 2010.Note: The prevalence rates were adjusted according to the minority population based on the sixth nationwide population census (2010).
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f1: Prevalence of overweight/malnutrition among minority groups by age group from 1991 to 2010.Note: The prevalence rates were adjusted according to the minority population based on the sixth nationwide population census (2010).

Mentions: A lower rate of prevalence for overweight and malnutrition was found among children living in rural regions compared with those living in urban regions (overweight: RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.81–0.87; malnutrition: RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.87–0.90). Likewise, a lower rate of prevalence in other regions was found when compared with that in urban regions (overweight: RR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.62–0.65; malnutrition: RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.86–0.91) (Table 3). The prevalence of overweight increased in all age groups from 1991 to 2010, among which the 10–12-year age group had the highest overweight prevalence (RR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.36–1.44). However, in these same years, the prevalence of malnutrition remained stable and the highest prevalence of malnutrition occurred in the 13–15-year age group (RR, 3.30; 95% CI, 3.21–3.29) (Fig. 1 and Table 3).


Prevalence of overweight and malnutrition among ethnic minority children and adolescents in China, 1991 – 2010
Prevalence of overweight/malnutrition among minority groups by age group from 1991 to 2010.Note: The prevalence rates were adjusted according to the minority population based on the sixth nationwide population census (2010).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121587&req=5

f1: Prevalence of overweight/malnutrition among minority groups by age group from 1991 to 2010.Note: The prevalence rates were adjusted according to the minority population based on the sixth nationwide population census (2010).
Mentions: A lower rate of prevalence for overweight and malnutrition was found among children living in rural regions compared with those living in urban regions (overweight: RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.81–0.87; malnutrition: RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.87–0.90). Likewise, a lower rate of prevalence in other regions was found when compared with that in urban regions (overweight: RR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.62–0.65; malnutrition: RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.86–0.91) (Table 3). The prevalence of overweight increased in all age groups from 1991 to 2010, among which the 10–12-year age group had the highest overweight prevalence (RR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.36–1.44). However, in these same years, the prevalence of malnutrition remained stable and the highest prevalence of malnutrition occurred in the 13–15-year age group (RR, 3.30; 95% CI, 3.21–3.29) (Fig. 1 and Table 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine the trends in prevalence of childhood overweight and malnutrition in a large Chinese ethnic minority population from 1991 to 2010. In the Chinese National Survey on Students’ Constitution and Health from 1991 to 2010, multistage stratified sampling was conducted in the series of cross-sectional studies. Participants were 7–18-year-old students randomly selected by sex and region, and included Han and 26 ethnic minorities. During the survey period, the overall prevalence of overweight increased from 5.8% to 13.5%, and malnutrition trend increased from 3.6% to 4.1% in ethnic minority children and adolescents. Moreover, Korean and Mongol children were more likely than Han children to be obese (Korean: RR = 1.52; 95% CI: 1.48–1.56; Mongol: RR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.20–1.28). Among these minorities, the Dongxiang and Li children were more likely to be malnourished (Li: RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.37–1.57; Dongxiang: RR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.34–1.58). Shui, Khalkhas, Lisu, and Monguor children were less likely to be overweight and malnourished compared with the Hans. The prevalence of overweight among ethnicities increased yearly while that for malnutrition has fluctuated over the past few decades.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus