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Initiators and Barriers to Discussion and Treatment of Premature Ejaculation Among Men and Their Partners in Asia Pacific – Results From a Web-based Survey

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Premature ejaculation (PE) is one of the most prevalent yet under-reported sexual disorders. Differing sociocultural norms across the Asia-Pacific region provide unique challenges in PE management.

Methods: This web-based study collected data from 5,038 men and women across 11 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Respondents were recruited from an existing database.

Main outcome measures: The initiators and barriers for PE discussions and for seeking professional management following self-treatment, as well as their choices and expectations of healthcare professionals (HCPs).

Results: More than two-thirds of respondents have discussed PE with their partners, and men are more likely to initiate the discussion. Top drivers were for both partners to attain sexual satisfaction and greater fulfillment in the relationship. Emotional insecurity was the top barrier for men as they did not want to feel hurt or inadequate. Before consulting an HCP, more than two-thirds of men self-treated their PE for at least 20 months. The primary reason for stopping self-treatment and seeking medical management was a lack of improvement in sexual satisfaction. The ideal attributes that men seek in their HCP included trust and being knowledgeable about PE management.

Conclusion: Attitudes and barriers to PE and its treatment in the Asia-Pacific region are poorly understood. Many men are reluctant to seek professional advice and therefore resort to self-treatment for extended periods. HCPs can play a key role to empower PE sufferers and partners to understand the prevalence, medical relevance, treatability, and negative impacts of PE on sexual and overall relationships. Greater awareness of the diverse cultural and social norms, education of both partners and HCPs, and the involvement of HCPs through a patient-centric approach are all pivotal in managing PE optimally across the Asia-Pacific region.

No MeSH data available.


Survey participants with PE.
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fig2: Survey participants with PE.

Mentions: The percentage of men with probable/definite PE based on PEDT and who also acknowledge having experienced PE was 48% across the Asia-Pacific region. The highest percentages of men in this group were from Australia (58%) and China (56%), whereas Singapore (38%) and Vietnam (38%) had the lowest percentage. For respondents with probable/definite PE based on PEDT, the percentage of men who however did not acknowledge having experienced PE was 15% across the Asia-Pacific region. The highest percentages of men in this group were from Singapore (25%) and Malaysia (22%), whereas China (9%) had the lowest percentage (Figure 2).


Initiators and Barriers to Discussion and Treatment of Premature Ejaculation Among Men and Their Partners in Asia Pacific – Results From a Web-based Survey
Survey participants with PE.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121536&req=5

fig2: Survey participants with PE.
Mentions: The percentage of men with probable/definite PE based on PEDT and who also acknowledge having experienced PE was 48% across the Asia-Pacific region. The highest percentages of men in this group were from Australia (58%) and China (56%), whereas Singapore (38%) and Vietnam (38%) had the lowest percentage. For respondents with probable/definite PE based on PEDT, the percentage of men who however did not acknowledge having experienced PE was 15% across the Asia-Pacific region. The highest percentages of men in this group were from Singapore (25%) and Malaysia (22%), whereas China (9%) had the lowest percentage (Figure 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Premature ejaculation (PE) is one of the most prevalent yet under-reported sexual disorders. Differing sociocultural norms across the Asia-Pacific region provide unique challenges in PE management.

Methods: This web-based study collected data from 5,038 men and women across 11 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Respondents were recruited from an existing database.

Main outcome measures: The initiators and barriers for PE discussions and for seeking professional management following self-treatment, as well as their choices and expectations of healthcare professionals (HCPs).

Results: More than two-thirds of respondents have discussed PE with their partners, and men are more likely to initiate the discussion. Top drivers were for both partners to attain sexual satisfaction and greater fulfillment in the relationship. Emotional insecurity was the top barrier for men as they did not want to feel hurt or inadequate. Before consulting an HCP, more than two-thirds of men self-treated their PE for at least 20 months. The primary reason for stopping self-treatment and seeking medical management was a lack of improvement in sexual satisfaction. The ideal attributes that men seek in their HCP included trust and being knowledgeable about PE management.

Conclusion: Attitudes and barriers to PE and its treatment in the Asia-Pacific region are poorly understood. Many men are reluctant to seek professional advice and therefore resort to self-treatment for extended periods. HCPs can play a key role to empower PE sufferers and partners to understand the prevalence, medical relevance, treatability, and negative impacts of PE on sexual and overall relationships. Greater awareness of the diverse cultural and social norms, education of both partners and HCPs, and the involvement of HCPs through a patient-centric approach are all pivotal in managing PE optimally across the Asia-Pacific region.

No MeSH data available.