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Effects of a Health ‐ Partner Intervention on Cardiovascular Risk

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Lifestyle modifications are first‐line measures for cardiovascular disease prevention. Whether lifestyle intervention also preserves cardiovascular health is less clear. Our study examined the role of a Health Partner–administered lifestyle intervention on metrics of ideal cardiovascular health.

Methods and results: A total of 711 university employees (48±11 years; 66% women, 72% Caucasian/22.5% African Americans) enrolled in a program that promoted healthier lifestyles at Emory University (Atlanta, GA). Anthropometric, laboratory, and physical activity measurements were performed at baseline and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years of follow‐up. Results were utilized by the Health Partner to generate a personalized plan aimed at meeting ideal health metrics. Compared to baseline, at each of the 6‐month, 1‐year, and 2‐year follow‐up visits, systolic blood pressure was lower by 3.6, 4.6, and 3.3 mm Hg (P<0.001), total cholesterol decreased by 5.3, 6.5, and 6.4 mg/dL (P<0.001), body mass index declined by 0.33, 0.45, and 0.38 kg/m2 (P<0.001), and the percentage of smokers decreased by 1.3%, 3.5%, and 3.5% (P<0.01), respectively. Changes were greater in those with greater abnormalities at baseline. Finally, the American Heart Association “Life's Simple 7” ideal cardiovascular health score increased by 0.28, 0.40, and 0.33 at 6 month, 1 year, and 2 years, respectively, compared to baseline visit.

Conclusions: A personalized, goal‐directed Health Partner intervention significantly improved the cardiometabolic risk profile and metrics of cardiovascular health. These effects were evident at 6 months following enrollment and were sustained for 2 years. Whether the Health Partner intervention improves long‐term morbidity and mortality and is cost‐effective needs further investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Change in Framingham risk score (FRS) and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk scores for participants with (A) baseline FRS <5.2% (2.6±1.3%), (B) baseline FRS ≥5.2% (11.4±7.1%), (C) baseline ASCVD <2.4% (1.0±0.6%), and (D) baseline ASCVD ≥2.4% (3.1±1.1%) at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years compared to baseline visit. Mean changes and the corresponding 95% CIs at each visit are shown.
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jah31831-fig-0004: Change in Framingham risk score (FRS) and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk scores for participants with (A) baseline FRS <5.2% (2.6±1.3%), (B) baseline FRS ≥5.2% (11.4±7.1%), (C) baseline ASCVD <2.4% (1.0±0.6%), and (D) baseline ASCVD ≥2.4% (3.1±1.1%) at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years compared to baseline visit. Mean changes and the corresponding 95% CIs at each visit are shown.

Mentions: In the entire cohort, there was a 12% reduction in FRS and ACVD risk score over 2 years (P<0.0001), after accounting for aging effect on risk scores. The cohort was divided into those with low (<median) and high risk scores (≥median; Figure 4. Both risk scores improved significantly in those with high, but not in those with low, risk scores at baseline (P<0.0001 between groups).


Effects of a Health ‐ Partner Intervention on Cardiovascular Risk
Change in Framingham risk score (FRS) and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk scores for participants with (A) baseline FRS <5.2% (2.6±1.3%), (B) baseline FRS ≥5.2% (11.4±7.1%), (C) baseline ASCVD <2.4% (1.0±0.6%), and (D) baseline ASCVD ≥2.4% (3.1±1.1%) at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years compared to baseline visit. Mean changes and the corresponding 95% CIs at each visit are shown.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121518&req=5

jah31831-fig-0004: Change in Framingham risk score (FRS) and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk scores for participants with (A) baseline FRS <5.2% (2.6±1.3%), (B) baseline FRS ≥5.2% (11.4±7.1%), (C) baseline ASCVD <2.4% (1.0±0.6%), and (D) baseline ASCVD ≥2.4% (3.1±1.1%) at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years compared to baseline visit. Mean changes and the corresponding 95% CIs at each visit are shown.
Mentions: In the entire cohort, there was a 12% reduction in FRS and ACVD risk score over 2 years (P<0.0001), after accounting for aging effect on risk scores. The cohort was divided into those with low (<median) and high risk scores (≥median; Figure 4. Both risk scores improved significantly in those with high, but not in those with low, risk scores at baseline (P<0.0001 between groups).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Lifestyle modifications are first&#8208;line measures for cardiovascular disease prevention. Whether lifestyle intervention also preserves cardiovascular health is less clear. Our study examined the role of a Health Partner&ndash;administered lifestyle intervention on metrics of ideal cardiovascular health.

Methods and results: A total of 711 university employees (48&plusmn;11&nbsp;years; 66% women, 72% Caucasian/22.5% African Americans) enrolled in a program that promoted healthier lifestyles at Emory University (Atlanta, GA). Anthropometric, laboratory, and physical activity measurements were performed at baseline and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years of follow&#8208;up. Results were utilized by the Health Partner to generate a personalized plan aimed at meeting ideal health metrics. Compared to baseline, at each of the 6&#8208;month, 1&#8208;year, and 2&#8208;year follow&#8208;up visits, systolic blood pressure was lower by 3.6, 4.6, and 3.3&nbsp;mm&nbsp;Hg (P&lt;0.001), total cholesterol decreased by 5.3, 6.5, and 6.4&nbsp;mg/dL (P&lt;0.001), body mass index declined by 0.33, 0.45, and 0.38&nbsp;kg/m2 (P&lt;0.001), and the percentage of smokers decreased by 1.3%, 3.5%, and 3.5% (P&lt;0.01), respectively. Changes were greater in those with greater abnormalities at baseline. Finally, the American Heart Association &ldquo;Life's Simple 7&rdquo; ideal cardiovascular health score increased by 0.28, 0.40, and 0.33 at 6&nbsp;month, 1&nbsp;year, and 2&nbsp;years, respectively, compared to baseline visit.

Conclusions: A personalized, goal&#8208;directed Health Partner intervention significantly improved the cardiometabolic risk profile and metrics of cardiovascular health. These effects were evident at 6&nbsp;months following enrollment and were sustained for 2&nbsp;years. Whether the Health Partner intervention improves long&#8208;term morbidity and mortality and is cost&#8208;effective needs further investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus