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Microbiota ‐ Dependent Metabolite Trimethylamine N ‐ Oxide and Coronary Artery Calcium in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study ( CARDIA )

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Clinical studies implicate trimethylamine N‐oxide (TMAO; a gut microbiota‐dependent nutrient metabolite) in cardiovascular disease risk. There is a lack of population‐based data on the role of TMAO in advancing early atherosclerotic disease. We tested the prospective associations between TMAO and coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid intima‐media thickness (cIMT).

Methods and results: Data were from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA), a biracial cohort of US adults recruited in 1985–1986 (n=5115). We randomly sampled 817 participants (aged 33–55 years) who attended examinations in 2000–2001, 2005–2006, and 2010–2011, at which CAC was measured by computed tomography and cIMT (2005–2006) by ultrasound. TMAO was quantified using liquid chromotography mass spectrometry on plasma collected in 2000–2001. Outcomes were incident CAC, defined as Agatston units=0 in 2000–2001 and >0 over 10‐year follow‐up, CAC progression (any increase over 10‐year follow‐up), and continuous cIMT. Over the study period, 25% (n=184) of those free of CAC in 2000–2001 (n=746) developed detectable CAC. In 2000–2001, median (interquartile range) TMAO was 2.6 (1.8–4.2) μmol/L. In multivariable‐adjusted models, TMAO was not associated with 10‐year CAC incidence (rate ratio=1.03; 95% CI: 0.71–1.52) or CAC progression (0.97; 0.68–1.38) in Poisson regression, or cIMT (beta coefficient: −0.009; −0.03 to 0.01) in linear regression, comparing the fourth to the first quartiles of TMAO.

Conclusions: In this population‐based study, TMAO was not associated with measures of atherosclerosis: CAC incidence, CAC progression, or cIMT. These data indicate that TMAO may not contribute significantly to advancing early atherosclerotic disease risk among healthy early‐middle‐aged adults.

No MeSH data available.


Flow diagram for eligibility and selection of study sample. CAC indicates coronary artery calcium; CARDIA, Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.
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jah31761-fig-0001: Flow diagram for eligibility and selection of study sample. CAC indicates coronary artery calcium; CARDIA, Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

Mentions: The 10‐year study period for the present analysis was 2000–2001 through 2010–2011, years 15, 20, and 25 of CARDIA. We randomly selected 860 individuals from within race‐sex strata of participants who attended the 2000–2001 exam; had CAC data from 2000 to 2001, 2005 to 2006, and 2010 to 2011; and complete covariate data from 2000 to 2001 (Figure). Of these participants, 817 had stored plasma for analysis (Figure). The analytic sample comprised 211 black men, 194 black women, 213 white men, and 199 white women, representing 30%, 19%, 23%, and 19% of the respective stratum‐specific 2000–2001 exam totals.


Microbiota ‐ Dependent Metabolite Trimethylamine N ‐ Oxide and Coronary Artery Calcium in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study ( CARDIA )
Flow diagram for eligibility and selection of study sample. CAC indicates coronary artery calcium; CARDIA, Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy-nc-nd
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121500&req=5

jah31761-fig-0001: Flow diagram for eligibility and selection of study sample. CAC indicates coronary artery calcium; CARDIA, Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.
Mentions: The 10‐year study period for the present analysis was 2000–2001 through 2010–2011, years 15, 20, and 25 of CARDIA. We randomly selected 860 individuals from within race‐sex strata of participants who attended the 2000–2001 exam; had CAC data from 2000 to 2001, 2005 to 2006, and 2010 to 2011; and complete covariate data from 2000 to 2001 (Figure). Of these participants, 817 had stored plasma for analysis (Figure). The analytic sample comprised 211 black men, 194 black women, 213 white men, and 199 white women, representing 30%, 19%, 23%, and 19% of the respective stratum‐specific 2000–2001 exam totals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Clinical studies implicate trimethylamine N‐oxide (TMAO; a gut microbiota‐dependent nutrient metabolite) in cardiovascular disease risk. There is a lack of population‐based data on the role of TMAO in advancing early atherosclerotic disease. We tested the prospective associations between TMAO and coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid intima‐media thickness (cIMT).

Methods and results: Data were from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA), a biracial cohort of US adults recruited in 1985–1986 (n=5115). We randomly sampled 817 participants (aged 33–55 years) who attended examinations in 2000–2001, 2005–2006, and 2010–2011, at which CAC was measured by computed tomography and cIMT (2005–2006) by ultrasound. TMAO was quantified using liquid chromotography mass spectrometry on plasma collected in 2000–2001. Outcomes were incident CAC, defined as Agatston units=0 in 2000–2001 and >0 over 10‐year follow‐up, CAC progression (any increase over 10‐year follow‐up), and continuous cIMT. Over the study period, 25% (n=184) of those free of CAC in 2000–2001 (n=746) developed detectable CAC. In 2000–2001, median (interquartile range) TMAO was 2.6 (1.8–4.2) μmol/L. In multivariable‐adjusted models, TMAO was not associated with 10‐year CAC incidence (rate ratio=1.03; 95% CI: 0.71–1.52) or CAC progression (0.97; 0.68–1.38) in Poisson regression, or cIMT (beta coefficient: −0.009; −0.03 to 0.01) in linear regression, comparing the fourth to the first quartiles of TMAO.

Conclusions: In this population‐based study, TMAO was not associated with measures of atherosclerosis: CAC incidence, CAC progression, or cIMT. These data indicate that TMAO may not contribute significantly to advancing early atherosclerotic disease risk among healthy early‐middle‐aged adults.

No MeSH data available.