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Comparison of Vascular Responses Following New ‐ Generation Biodegradable and Durable Polymer ‐ Based Drug ‐ Eluting Stent Implantation in an Atherosclerotic Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Incomplete endothelialization is the primary substrate of late stent thrombosis; however, recent reports have revealed that abnormal vascular responses are also responsible for the occurrence of late stent failure. The aim of the current study was to assess vascular response following deployment of biodegradable polymer‐based Synergy (Boston Scientific) and Nobori (Terumo) drug‐eluting stents and the durable polymer‐based Resolute Integrity stent (Medtronic) in an atherosclerotic rabbit iliac artery model.

Methods and results: A total of 24 rabbits were fed an atherogenic diet, and then a balloon injury was used to induce atheroma formation. Synergy, Nobori, and Resolute Integrity stents were randomly implanted in iliac arteries. Animals were euthanized at 28 days for scanning electron microscopic evaluation and at 90 days for histological analysis. The percentage of uncovered strut area at 28 days was lowest with Synergy, followed by Resolute Integrity, and was significantly higher with Nobori stents (Synergy 1.1±2.2%, Resolute Integrity 2.0±3.9%, Nobori 4.6±3.0%; P<0.001). At 90 days, inflammation score was lowest for Synergy (0.27±0.45), followed by Nobori (0.62±0.59), and was highest for Resolute Integrity (0.89±0.46, P<0.001). Foamy macrophage infiltration within neointima (ie, neoatherosclerosis) was significantly less with Synergy (0.62±0.82) compared with Nobori (0.85±0.74) and Resolute Integrity (1.39±1.32; P=0.034).

Conclusions: The biodegradable polymer‐coated thin‐strut Synergy drug‐eluting stent showed the fastest stent strut neointimal coverage and the lowest incidence of neoatherosclerosis in the current animal model.

No MeSH data available.


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Atherosclerotic rabbit model. Balloon injury was performed after initiation of high cholesterol diet followed by switching of diet to normal chow. Animals euthanized at 28 days were used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and those euthanized at 90 days were used for light microscopic analysis. W indicates weeks.
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jah31838-fig-0001: Atherosclerotic rabbit model. Balloon injury was performed after initiation of high cholesterol diet followed by switching of diet to normal chow. Animals euthanized at 28 days were used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and those euthanized at 90 days were used for light microscopic analysis. W indicates weeks.

Mentions: The atherosclerotic rabbit model was used, as described previously.16 Briefly, rabbits (Tokyo Laboratory Animals Science Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) were fed an atherogenic diet (1% cholesterol and 6% peanut oil; Oriental Yeast Co, Ltd) to induce atheroma formation. At 1 week after initiation of the atherogenic diet, balloon injury was performed using a 3.0×15‐mm balloon catheter by withdrawing the inflated balloon at a nominal pressure from the distal iliac artery to the aorta. After balloon injury, animals were maintained on an atherogenic diet for another 6 weeks (total of 7 weeks). The diet was then switched to regular rabbit chow until euthanasia (Figure 1). Stents were implanted 2 weeks after the regular rabbit chow started.


Comparison of Vascular Responses Following New ‐ Generation Biodegradable and Durable Polymer ‐ Based Drug ‐ Eluting Stent Implantation in an Atherosclerotic Rabbit Iliac Artery Model
Atherosclerotic rabbit model. Balloon injury was performed after initiation of high cholesterol diet followed by switching of diet to normal chow. Animals euthanized at 28 days were used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and those euthanized at 90 days were used for light microscopic analysis. W indicates weeks.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy-nc
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121480&req=5

jah31838-fig-0001: Atherosclerotic rabbit model. Balloon injury was performed after initiation of high cholesterol diet followed by switching of diet to normal chow. Animals euthanized at 28 days were used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and those euthanized at 90 days were used for light microscopic analysis. W indicates weeks.
Mentions: The atherosclerotic rabbit model was used, as described previously.16 Briefly, rabbits (Tokyo Laboratory Animals Science Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) were fed an atherogenic diet (1% cholesterol and 6% peanut oil; Oriental Yeast Co, Ltd) to induce atheroma formation. At 1 week after initiation of the atherogenic diet, balloon injury was performed using a 3.0×15‐mm balloon catheter by withdrawing the inflated balloon at a nominal pressure from the distal iliac artery to the aorta. After balloon injury, animals were maintained on an atherogenic diet for another 6 weeks (total of 7 weeks). The diet was then switched to regular rabbit chow until euthanasia (Figure 1). Stents were implanted 2 weeks after the regular rabbit chow started.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Incomplete endothelialization is the primary substrate of late stent thrombosis; however, recent reports have revealed that abnormal vascular responses are also responsible for the occurrence of late stent failure. The aim of the current study was to assess vascular response following deployment of biodegradable polymer‐based Synergy (Boston Scientific) and Nobori (Terumo) drug‐eluting stents and the durable polymer‐based Resolute Integrity stent (Medtronic) in an atherosclerotic rabbit iliac artery model.

Methods and results: A total of 24 rabbits were fed an atherogenic diet, and then a balloon injury was used to induce atheroma formation. Synergy, Nobori, and Resolute Integrity stents were randomly implanted in iliac arteries. Animals were euthanized at 28 days for scanning electron microscopic evaluation and at 90 days for histological analysis. The percentage of uncovered strut area at 28 days was lowest with Synergy, followed by Resolute Integrity, and was significantly higher with Nobori stents (Synergy 1.1±2.2%, Resolute Integrity 2.0±3.9%, Nobori 4.6±3.0%; P<0.001). At 90 days, inflammation score was lowest for Synergy (0.27±0.45), followed by Nobori (0.62±0.59), and was highest for Resolute Integrity (0.89±0.46, P<0.001). Foamy macrophage infiltration within neointima (ie, neoatherosclerosis) was significantly less with Synergy (0.62±0.82) compared with Nobori (0.85±0.74) and Resolute Integrity (1.39±1.32; P=0.034).

Conclusions: The biodegradable polymer‐coated thin‐strut Synergy drug‐eluting stent showed the fastest stent strut neointimal coverage and the lowest incidence of neoatherosclerosis in the current animal model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus