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Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum by Blood Testing Using a Bio-Flash Technology-Based Algorithm before Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Currently, conventional enzyme immunoassays which use manual gold immunoassays and colloidal tests (GICTs) are used as screening tools to detect Treponema pallidum (syphilis), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and HIV-2 in patients undergoing surgery. The present observational, cross-sectional study compared the sensitivity, specificity, and work flow characteristics of the conventional algorithm with manual GICTs with those of a newly proposed algorithm that uses the automated Bio-Flash technology as a screening tool in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. A total of 956 patients were examined for the presence of serological markers of infection with HIV-1/2, HCV, HBV, and T. pallidum. The proposed algorithm with the Bio-Flash technology was superior for the detection of all markers (100.0% sensitivity and specificity for detection of anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, HBV surface antigen [HBsAg], and T. pallidum) compared with the conventional algorithm based on the manual method (80.0% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity for the detection of anti-HIV, 75.0% sensitivity for the detection of anti-HCV, 94.7% sensitivity for the detection of HBsAg, and 100% specificity for the detection of anti-HCV and HBsAg) in these patients. The automated Bio-Flash technology-based screening algorithm also reduced the operation time by 85.0% (205 min) per day, saving up to 24 h/week. In conclusion, the use of the newly proposed screening algorithm based on the automated Bio-Flash technology can provide an advantage over the use of conventional algorithms based on manual methods for screening for HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis before GI endoscopy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative screening algorithm flowchart for detection of infection markers at the Beijing Military General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, China. Positive and negative refer to positivity and negativity for any evaluated markers.
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Figure 1: Representative screening algorithm flowchart for detection of infection markers at the Beijing Military General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, China. Positive and negative refer to positivity and negativity for any evaluated markers.

Mentions: Patients undergoing GI endoscopy were invited to participate in this study. Blood samples were collected from the participating patients by venipuncture. Serum was separated from the collected blood samples and tested for HIV, HCV, HBV, and T. pallidum infection markers. Retrospective samples from patients admitted to the hospital between 8 January and 16 March 2015 were analyzed for HIV, as no HIV-positive patients enrolled in the study. A representative screening algorithm flowchart for the detection of infection markers is shown in Fig. 1.


Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum by Blood Testing Using a Bio-Flash Technology-Based Algorithm before Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Representative screening algorithm flowchart for detection of infection markers at the Beijing Military General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, China. Positive and negative refer to positivity and negativity for any evaluated markers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121391&req=5

Figure 1: Representative screening algorithm flowchart for detection of infection markers at the Beijing Military General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, China. Positive and negative refer to positivity and negativity for any evaluated markers.
Mentions: Patients undergoing GI endoscopy were invited to participate in this study. Blood samples were collected from the participating patients by venipuncture. Serum was separated from the collected blood samples and tested for HIV, HCV, HBV, and T. pallidum infection markers. Retrospective samples from patients admitted to the hospital between 8 January and 16 March 2015 were analyzed for HIV, as no HIV-positive patients enrolled in the study. A representative screening algorithm flowchart for the detection of infection markers is shown in Fig. 1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Currently, conventional enzyme immunoassays which use manual gold immunoassays and colloidal tests (GICTs) are used as screening tools to detect Treponema pallidum (syphilis), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and HIV-2 in patients undergoing surgery. The present observational, cross-sectional study compared the sensitivity, specificity, and work flow characteristics of the conventional algorithm with manual GICTs with those of a newly proposed algorithm that uses the automated Bio-Flash technology as a screening tool in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. A total of 956 patients were examined for the presence of serological markers of infection with HIV-1/2, HCV, HBV, and T. pallidum. The proposed algorithm with the Bio-Flash technology was superior for the detection of all markers (100.0% sensitivity and specificity for detection of anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, HBV surface antigen [HBsAg], and T. pallidum) compared with the conventional algorithm based on the manual method (80.0% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity for the detection of anti-HIV, 75.0% sensitivity for the detection of anti-HCV, 94.7% sensitivity for the detection of HBsAg, and 100% specificity for the detection of anti-HCV and HBsAg) in these patients. The automated Bio-Flash technology-based screening algorithm also reduced the operation time by 85.0% (205 min) per day, saving up to 24 h/week. In conclusion, the use of the newly proposed screening algorithm based on the automated Bio-Flash technology can provide an advantage over the use of conventional algorithms based on manual methods for screening for HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis before GI endoscopy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus