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Parental knowledge reduces long term anxiety induced by false-positive test results after newborn screening for cystic fibrosis ☆

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: False-positive screening results in newborn screening for cystic fibrosis may lead to parental stress, family relationship problems and a changed perception of the child's health.

Aim of the study: To evaluate whether parental anxiety induced by a false positive screening result disappears after six months and to assess whether a special program to inform parents prior and during the screening procedure prevents or diminishes parental anxiety.

Methods: Prospective controlled study assessing the long term effects of false-positive test results of newborn screening for cystic fibrosis (NBSCF) on parental anxiety and stress by means of questionnaires sent to parents of 106 infants with a false positive newborn screening test and 318 randomly selected infants with a true negative screening test. Additionally we interviewed 25 parents of the false-positive group.

Results: Parents showed negative feelings after being informed about the positive screening test result. After confirmation that their child was healthy and not suffering from CF, most parents felt reassured. After six months no difference in anxiety levels between both groups of parents was found. Well-informed parents in the false positive group experienced less stress.

Conclusions: A positive screening test result induces parental anxiety but false positive test results in NBSCF do not seem to cause long-term anxiety. Well-informed parents show lower stress and anxiety levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Emotional feelings of parents expressed (a) after they were informed about the positive screening test result for CF and (b) six months after exclusion of the diagnosis cystic fibrosis. Parents were asked to report their feelings and emotions on a five point scale (1 = positive, 5 = negative). They were asked how they felt after being informed about the positive screening test for cystic fibrosis and six months after exclusion of the CF diagnosis. The figure represents the percentage of parents with a certain score (1–5).
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f0010: Emotional feelings of parents expressed (a) after they were informed about the positive screening test result for CF and (b) six months after exclusion of the diagnosis cystic fibrosis. Parents were asked to report their feelings and emotions on a five point scale (1 = positive, 5 = negative). They were asked how they felt after being informed about the positive screening test for cystic fibrosis and six months after exclusion of the CF diagnosis. The figure represents the percentage of parents with a certain score (1–5).

Mentions: We asked the FP group how they felt after being informed about the positive screening result. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.837, therefore we established a sum-scale ranging from 6 to 30 points (negative to positive). Parents showed strong negative feelings after being informed about the positive screening result, with a mean score of 9.1 (SD 4.93, range 6–30). Six months later, the diagnosis of CF excluded, the mean score increased to 26.5 (SD 5.16, range 8–30). Fig. 2a and b shows the difference between emotional feelings immediately after the positive test result and six months thereafter (p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between being well-informed and negative emotional feelings (p = 0.589).


Parental knowledge reduces long term anxiety induced by false-positive test results after newborn screening for cystic fibrosis ☆
Emotional feelings of parents expressed (a) after they were informed about the positive screening test result for CF and (b) six months after exclusion of the diagnosis cystic fibrosis. Parents were asked to report their feelings and emotions on a five point scale (1 = positive, 5 = negative). They were asked how they felt after being informed about the positive screening test for cystic fibrosis and six months after exclusion of the CF diagnosis. The figure represents the percentage of parents with a certain score (1–5).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121351&req=5

f0010: Emotional feelings of parents expressed (a) after they were informed about the positive screening test result for CF and (b) six months after exclusion of the diagnosis cystic fibrosis. Parents were asked to report their feelings and emotions on a five point scale (1 = positive, 5 = negative). They were asked how they felt after being informed about the positive screening test for cystic fibrosis and six months after exclusion of the CF diagnosis. The figure represents the percentage of parents with a certain score (1–5).
Mentions: We asked the FP group how they felt after being informed about the positive screening result. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.837, therefore we established a sum-scale ranging from 6 to 30 points (negative to positive). Parents showed strong negative feelings after being informed about the positive screening result, with a mean score of 9.1 (SD 4.93, range 6–30). Six months later, the diagnosis of CF excluded, the mean score increased to 26.5 (SD 5.16, range 8–30). Fig. 2a and b shows the difference between emotional feelings immediately after the positive test result and six months thereafter (p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between being well-informed and negative emotional feelings (p = 0.589).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: False-positive screening results in newborn screening for cystic fibrosis may lead to parental stress, family relationship problems and a changed perception of the child's health.

Aim of the study: To evaluate whether parental anxiety induced by a false positive screening result disappears after six months and to assess whether a special program to inform parents prior and during the screening procedure prevents or diminishes parental anxiety.

Methods: Prospective controlled study assessing the long term effects of false-positive test results of newborn screening for cystic fibrosis (NBSCF) on parental anxiety and stress by means of questionnaires sent to parents of 106 infants with a false positive newborn screening test and 318 randomly selected infants with a true negative screening test. Additionally we interviewed 25 parents of the false-positive group.

Results: Parents showed negative feelings after being informed about the positive screening test result. After confirmation that their child was healthy and not suffering from CF, most parents felt reassured. After six months no difference in anxiety levels between both groups of parents was found. Well-informed parents in the false positive group experienced less stress.

Conclusions: A positive screening test result induces parental anxiety but false positive test results in NBSCF do not seem to cause long-term anxiety. Well-informed parents show lower stress and anxiety levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus