Limits...
Flavored e-cigarette use: Characterizing youth, young adult, and adult users

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to investigate how the use of flavored e-cigarettes varies between youth (12–17 years old), young adults (18–29 years old), and older adults (30 + years old). Cross-sectional surveys of school-going youth (n = 3907) and young adult college students (n = 5482) in Texas, and young adults and older adults (n = 6051) nationwide were administered in 2014–2015. Proportions and 95% confidence intervals were used to describe the percentage of e-cigarette use at initiation and in the past 30 days that was flavored, among current e-cigarette users. Chi-square tests were applied to examine differences by combustible tobacco product use and demographic factors. Most e-cigarette users said their first and “usual” e-cigarettes were flavored. At initiation, the majority of Texas school-going youth (98%), Texas young adult college students (95%), and young adults (71.2%) nationwide said their first e-cigarettes were flavored to taste like something other than tobacco, compared to 44.1% of older adults nationwide. Fruit and candy flavors predominated for all groups; and, for youth, flavors were an especially salient reason to use e-cigarettes. Among adults, the use of tobacco flavor at initiation was common among dual users (e-cigarettes + combustible tobacco), while other flavors were more common among former cigarette smokers (P = 0.03). Restricting the range of e-cigarette flavors (e.g., eliminating sweet flavors, like fruit and candy) may benefit youth and young adult prevention efforts. However, it is unclear what impact this change would have on adult smoking cessation.

No MeSH data available.


Variability in flavored e-cigarette use among youth, young adult and adult current e-cigarette users.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121224&req=5

f0005: Variability in flavored e-cigarette use among youth, young adult and adult current e-cigarette users.

Mentions: Survey questions for all three studies were developed from a catalogue of valid and reliable measures used in state and national tobacco surveillance, including the PATH study (United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse, a.U.S.D.o.H.a.H.S.F.a.D.A. Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 2013-2016). Measures specific to e-cigarettes in the three studies are summarized in Table 1. The constructs are included ever and current use; use of flavors at initiation and “regularly”; and flavors as a reason to use e-cigarettes. The differences across studies in these measures include the following. For flavor use at initiation, TATAMS did not ask about unflavored e-cigarette use, and M-PACT participants were asked to check all flavor categories that applied. If any flavor was chosen, respondents were categorized as “flavored, not tobacco” in Table 2. This same rule was applied to all studies for current use of flavors in Table 2. In Fig. 1, the raw “check all that apply” form of current use item was retained instead to illustrate the maximum variability in flavors across the studies. M-PACT applied the flavor use at initiation question to only current users, while the other studies also applied it to ever users. For flavors as a reason to use, responses were dichotomized across all studies. The TPRPS survey only asked this question of adult current e-cigarette users (Table 3).


Flavored e-cigarette use: Characterizing youth, young adult, and adult users
Variability in flavored e-cigarette use among youth, young adult and adult current e-cigarette users.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121224&req=5

f0005: Variability in flavored e-cigarette use among youth, young adult and adult current e-cigarette users.
Mentions: Survey questions for all three studies were developed from a catalogue of valid and reliable measures used in state and national tobacco surveillance, including the PATH study (United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse, a.U.S.D.o.H.a.H.S.F.a.D.A. Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 2013-2016). Measures specific to e-cigarettes in the three studies are summarized in Table 1. The constructs are included ever and current use; use of flavors at initiation and “regularly”; and flavors as a reason to use e-cigarettes. The differences across studies in these measures include the following. For flavor use at initiation, TATAMS did not ask about unflavored e-cigarette use, and M-PACT participants were asked to check all flavor categories that applied. If any flavor was chosen, respondents were categorized as “flavored, not tobacco” in Table 2. This same rule was applied to all studies for current use of flavors in Table 2. In Fig. 1, the raw “check all that apply” form of current use item was retained instead to illustrate the maximum variability in flavors across the studies. M-PACT applied the flavor use at initiation question to only current users, while the other studies also applied it to ever users. For flavors as a reason to use, responses were dichotomized across all studies. The TPRPS survey only asked this question of adult current e-cigarette users (Table 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to investigate how the use of flavored e-cigarettes varies between youth (12–17 years old), young adults (18–29 years old), and older adults (30 + years old). Cross-sectional surveys of school-going youth (n = 3907) and young adult college students (n = 5482) in Texas, and young adults and older adults (n = 6051) nationwide were administered in 2014–2015. Proportions and 95% confidence intervals were used to describe the percentage of e-cigarette use at initiation and in the past 30 days that was flavored, among current e-cigarette users. Chi-square tests were applied to examine differences by combustible tobacco product use and demographic factors. Most e-cigarette users said their first and “usual” e-cigarettes were flavored. At initiation, the majority of Texas school-going youth (98%), Texas young adult college students (95%), and young adults (71.2%) nationwide said their first e-cigarettes were flavored to taste like something other than tobacco, compared to 44.1% of older adults nationwide. Fruit and candy flavors predominated for all groups; and, for youth, flavors were an especially salient reason to use e-cigarettes. Among adults, the use of tobacco flavor at initiation was common among dual users (e-cigarettes + combustible tobacco), while other flavors were more common among former cigarette smokers (P = 0.03). Restricting the range of e-cigarette flavors (e.g., eliminating sweet flavors, like fruit and candy) may benefit youth and young adult prevention efforts. However, it is unclear what impact this change would have on adult smoking cessation.

No MeSH data available.