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Plant Physiological, Morphological and Yield-Related Responses to Night Temperature Changes across Different Species and Plant Functional Types

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Land surface temperature over the past decades has shown a faster warming trend during the night than during the day. Extremely low night temperatures have occurred frequently due to the influence of land-sea thermal difference, topography and climate change. This asymmetric night temperature change is expected to affect plant ecophysiology and growth, as the plant carbon consumption processes could be affected more than the assimilation processes because photosynthesis in most plants occurs during the daytime whereas plant respiration occurs throughout the day. The effects of high night temperature (HNT) and low night temperature (LNT) on plant ecophysiological and growing processes and how the effects vary among different plant functional types (PFTs) have not been analyzed extensively. In this meta-analysis, we examined the effect of HNT and LNT on plant physiology and growth across different PFTs and experimental settings. Plant species were grouped according to their photosynthetic pathways (C3, C4, and CAM), growth forms (herbaceous, woody), and economic purposes (crop, non-crop). We found that HNT and LNT both had a negative effect on plant yield, but the effect of HNT on plant yield was primarily related to a reduction in biomass allocation to reproduction organs and the effect of LNT on plant yield was more related to a negative effect on total biomass. Leaf growth was stimulated at HNT and suppressed at LNT. HNT accelerated plants ecophysiological processes, including photosynthesis and dark respiration, while LNT slowed these processes. Overall, the results showed that the effects of night temperature on plant physiology and growth varied between HNT and LNT, among the response variables and PFTs, and depended on the magnitude of temperature change and experimental design. These findings suggest complexities and challenges in seeking general patterns of terrestrial plant growth in HNT and LNT. The PFT specific responses of plants are critical for obtaining credible predictions of the changes in crop production, plant community structure, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning of terrestrial biomes when asymmetric night temperature change continues.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlations between the magnitude of NT treatment and the response ratio of (A) plant height; (B) number of leaves; (C) leaf area index (LAI); (D) specific leaf area (SLA); (E) leaf area ratio (LAR). Each point represents response ratio (lnr) to HNT or LNT. Regression function, variation coefficient and p-value are presented in the middle of each graph. Different lines indicate X = 0 (red line), x-value when y is the maximum, crossing points of y = 0 (green line) and regression relationships.
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Figure 8: Correlations between the magnitude of NT treatment and the response ratio of (A) plant height; (B) number of leaves; (C) leaf area index (LAI); (D) specific leaf area (SLA); (E) leaf area ratio (LAR). Each point represents response ratio (lnr) to HNT or LNT. Regression function, variation coefficient and p-value are presented in the middle of each graph. Different lines indicate X = 0 (red line), x-value when y is the maximum, crossing points of y = 0 (green line) and regression relationships.

Mentions: Most ecophysiological and growth parameters formed a quadratic relationship, except for Rd, which responded linearly, to night temperature treatment (Figures 7–9). Anet, gs, and tissue N were the highest when NT was 0.675, 5.43, and 2.1°C above ambient temperature, respectively (Figure 7). Morphological parameters, including number of leaves, LAI, SLA, and LAR, formed downward-opening parabola relationships with night temperature change, while plant height, on the other hand, formed an upward-opening parabola relationship with night temperature change (Figure 8). Yield-related parameters including leaf, stem, above-ground and below-ground dry biomass as well as the number of reproductive organs, days to flowering, fruit size and fruit weight had downward-opening quadratic relationships with night temperature change (Figure 9).


Plant Physiological, Morphological and Yield-Related Responses to Night Temperature Changes across Different Species and Plant Functional Types
Correlations between the magnitude of NT treatment and the response ratio of (A) plant height; (B) number of leaves; (C) leaf area index (LAI); (D) specific leaf area (SLA); (E) leaf area ratio (LAR). Each point represents response ratio (lnr) to HNT or LNT. Regression function, variation coefficient and p-value are presented in the middle of each graph. Different lines indicate X = 0 (red line), x-value when y is the maximum, crossing points of y = 0 (green line) and regression relationships.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121221&req=5

Figure 8: Correlations between the magnitude of NT treatment and the response ratio of (A) plant height; (B) number of leaves; (C) leaf area index (LAI); (D) specific leaf area (SLA); (E) leaf area ratio (LAR). Each point represents response ratio (lnr) to HNT or LNT. Regression function, variation coefficient and p-value are presented in the middle of each graph. Different lines indicate X = 0 (red line), x-value when y is the maximum, crossing points of y = 0 (green line) and regression relationships.
Mentions: Most ecophysiological and growth parameters formed a quadratic relationship, except for Rd, which responded linearly, to night temperature treatment (Figures 7–9). Anet, gs, and tissue N were the highest when NT was 0.675, 5.43, and 2.1°C above ambient temperature, respectively (Figure 7). Morphological parameters, including number of leaves, LAI, SLA, and LAR, formed downward-opening parabola relationships with night temperature change, while plant height, on the other hand, formed an upward-opening parabola relationship with night temperature change (Figure 8). Yield-related parameters including leaf, stem, above-ground and below-ground dry biomass as well as the number of reproductive organs, days to flowering, fruit size and fruit weight had downward-opening quadratic relationships with night temperature change (Figure 9).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Land surface temperature over the past decades has shown a faster warming trend during the night than during the day. Extremely low night temperatures have occurred frequently due to the influence of land-sea thermal difference, topography and climate change. This asymmetric night temperature change is expected to affect plant ecophysiology and growth, as the plant carbon consumption processes could be affected more than the assimilation processes because photosynthesis in most plants occurs during the daytime whereas plant respiration occurs throughout the day. The effects of high night temperature (HNT) and low night temperature (LNT) on plant ecophysiological and growing processes and how the effects vary among different plant functional types (PFTs) have not been analyzed extensively. In this meta-analysis, we examined the effect of HNT and LNT on plant physiology and growth across different PFTs and experimental settings. Plant species were grouped according to their photosynthetic pathways (C3, C4, and CAM), growth forms (herbaceous, woody), and economic purposes (crop, non-crop). We found that HNT and LNT both had a negative effect on plant yield, but the effect of HNT on plant yield was primarily related to a reduction in biomass allocation to reproduction organs and the effect of LNT on plant yield was more related to a negative effect on total biomass. Leaf growth was stimulated at HNT and suppressed at LNT. HNT accelerated plants ecophysiological processes, including photosynthesis and dark respiration, while LNT slowed these processes. Overall, the results showed that the effects of night temperature on plant physiology and growth varied between HNT and LNT, among the response variables and PFTs, and depended on the magnitude of temperature change and experimental design. These findings suggest complexities and challenges in seeking general patterns of terrestrial plant growth in HNT and LNT. The PFT specific responses of plants are critical for obtaining credible predictions of the changes in crop production, plant community structure, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning of terrestrial biomes when asymmetric night temperature change continues.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus