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Cerebellar hemisphere herniation in the neck: Case report of a very rare complication following a posterior fossa craniectomy

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ABSTRACT

Cerebellar herniation following a craniectomy to the posterior fossa is a rare complication.

Surgery was necessary to push the cerebellum back inside and plastic surgery to the bone was carried out.

Possible causes were discussed.

Possible causes were discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The MRI after the plastic surgery to the cranium shows the resolution of the herniation.
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fig0015: The MRI after the plastic surgery to the cranium shows the resolution of the herniation.

Mentions: It was deemed necessary to widen by a small degree the area of cranium removed; then, without removing the aforementioned membrane, the chief surgeon with the palms of his hands placed a gentle but steady pressure on the bulging part of the cerebellum thus managing to slowly push it back into the posterior fossa of the cranium. A titanium plate was immediately used to replace the missing area of the cranium and fibrin glue was applied outside the plate to add volume. Barely a few hours after surgery, symptoms disappeared entirely. The MRI carried out the day after the new surgery confirmed the complete resolution of the herniation (Fig. 3). Subsequent MRI scans and clinical check-ups in the following months showed no abnormalities.


Cerebellar hemisphere herniation in the neck: Case report of a very rare complication following a posterior fossa craniectomy
The MRI after the plastic surgery to the cranium shows the resolution of the herniation.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121204&req=5

fig0015: The MRI after the plastic surgery to the cranium shows the resolution of the herniation.
Mentions: It was deemed necessary to widen by a small degree the area of cranium removed; then, without removing the aforementioned membrane, the chief surgeon with the palms of his hands placed a gentle but steady pressure on the bulging part of the cerebellum thus managing to slowly push it back into the posterior fossa of the cranium. A titanium plate was immediately used to replace the missing area of the cranium and fibrin glue was applied outside the plate to add volume. Barely a few hours after surgery, symptoms disappeared entirely. The MRI carried out the day after the new surgery confirmed the complete resolution of the herniation (Fig. 3). Subsequent MRI scans and clinical check-ups in the following months showed no abnormalities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Cerebellar herniation following a craniectomy to the posterior fossa is a rare complication.

Surgery was necessary to push the cerebellum back inside and plastic surgery to the bone was carried out.

Possible causes were discussed.

Possible causes were discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus