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Cerebellar hemisphere herniation in the neck: Case report of a very rare complication following a posterior fossa craniectomy

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ABSTRACT

Cerebellar herniation following a craniectomy to the posterior fossa is a rare complication.

Surgery was necessary to push the cerebellum back inside and plastic surgery to the bone was carried out.

Possible causes were discussed.

Possible causes were discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

image of the angioblastoma before removal with the first surgery, which comprised the craniectomy procedure.
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fig0005: image of the angioblastoma before removal with the first surgery, which comprised the craniectomy procedure.

Mentions: A 40-year-old woman underwent a right side suboccipital craniectomy to remove in-toto a cerebellar angioblastoma (Fig. 1). As is often the case in this kind of surgery, the dura mater shrunk somewhat and could only be partially stretched out and stitched back up, so in order to close the remaining gap, a self-adhesive artificial substitute patch was used, which was made of synthetic and resorbable biomaterial. The Patient was discharged from hospital five days after surgery in great general health, without any neurological impairments; she had also undergone a post-operative CT scan that showed no oedema or haemorrhage in the site of surgery, nor the presence of any other type of problem. She had a check-up a week after being discharged and the stitches were removed. The wound had closed and her neurological conditions were excellent.


Cerebellar hemisphere herniation in the neck: Case report of a very rare complication following a posterior fossa craniectomy
image of the angioblastoma before removal with the first surgery, which comprised the craniectomy procedure.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121204&req=5

fig0005: image of the angioblastoma before removal with the first surgery, which comprised the craniectomy procedure.
Mentions: A 40-year-old woman underwent a right side suboccipital craniectomy to remove in-toto a cerebellar angioblastoma (Fig. 1). As is often the case in this kind of surgery, the dura mater shrunk somewhat and could only be partially stretched out and stitched back up, so in order to close the remaining gap, a self-adhesive artificial substitute patch was used, which was made of synthetic and resorbable biomaterial. The Patient was discharged from hospital five days after surgery in great general health, without any neurological impairments; she had also undergone a post-operative CT scan that showed no oedema or haemorrhage in the site of surgery, nor the presence of any other type of problem. She had a check-up a week after being discharged and the stitches were removed. The wound had closed and her neurological conditions were excellent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Cerebellar herniation following a craniectomy to the posterior fossa is a rare complication.

Surgery was necessary to push the cerebellum back inside and plastic surgery to the bone was carried out.

Possible causes were discussed.

Possible causes were discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus