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Executive attention networks show altered relationship with default mode network in PD

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Attention dysfunction is a common but often undiagnosed cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease that significantly reduces quality of life. We sought to increase understanding of the mechanisms underlying attention dysfunction using functional neuroimaging. Functional MRI was acquired at two repeated sessions in the resting state and during the Attention Network Test, for 25 non-demented subjects with Parkinson's disease and 21 healthy controls. Behavioral and MRI contrasts were calculated for alerting, orienting, and executive control components of attention. Brain regions showing group differences in attention processing were used as seeds in a functional connectivity analysis of a separate resting state run. Parkinson's disease subjects showed more activation during increased executive challenge in four regions of the dorsal attention and frontoparietal networks, namely right frontal eye field, left and right intraparietal sulcus, and precuneus. In three regions we saw reduced resting state connectivity to the default mode network. Further, whereas higher task activation in the right intraparietal sulcus correlated with reduced resting state connectivity between right intraparietal sulcus and the precuneus in healthy controls, this relationship was absent in Parkinson's disease subjects. Our results suggest that a weakened interaction between the default mode and task positive networks might alter the way in which the executive response is processed in PD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study Design. The ANT fMRI task creates maps of group difference task clusters for each attention network. The resting state time series in each task cluster generates rsFC maps, which are compared across groups, generating rsFC clusters. ANT, Attention Network Test; rsFC, resting state functional connectivity.
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f0005: Study Design. The ANT fMRI task creates maps of group difference task clusters for each attention network. The resting state time series in each task cluster generates rsFC maps, which are compared across groups, generating rsFC clusters. ANT, Attention Network Test; rsFC, resting state functional connectivity.

Mentions: The main purpose of the study was to identify group differences in attention networks, using both task activated and resting state fMRI. The design of the study is illustrated in Fig. 1. Imaging data was collected over two sessions, with each session comprised a resting state fMRI scan, followed by an fMRI task (Attention Network Test; ANT), and structural scans. The fMRI task data was analyzed first to identify brain regions (task clusters) where the groups significantly differed in activation for each attention component (alerting, orienting, executive). We then asked the question if there were any group differences in rsFC with those regions that differed in activation during the attention task. This was addressed by averaging the resting state fMRI time series in each task cluster; correlating this with the resting state fMRI time series at each voxel throughout the brain; and comparing the rsFC maps across groups. rsFC maps were generated and compared for each cluster for each attention component. This yielded brain regions (rsFC clusters) where the groups significantly differed in rsFC with the task clusters. Correlation analysis was then performed to assess for any group change in linear relationships between activation changes and rsFC changes.


Executive attention networks show altered relationship with default mode network in PD
Study Design. The ANT fMRI task creates maps of group difference task clusters for each attention network. The resting state time series in each task cluster generates rsFC maps, which are compared across groups, generating rsFC clusters. ANT, Attention Network Test; rsFC, resting state functional connectivity.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121155&req=5

f0005: Study Design. The ANT fMRI task creates maps of group difference task clusters for each attention network. The resting state time series in each task cluster generates rsFC maps, which are compared across groups, generating rsFC clusters. ANT, Attention Network Test; rsFC, resting state functional connectivity.
Mentions: The main purpose of the study was to identify group differences in attention networks, using both task activated and resting state fMRI. The design of the study is illustrated in Fig. 1. Imaging data was collected over two sessions, with each session comprised a resting state fMRI scan, followed by an fMRI task (Attention Network Test; ANT), and structural scans. The fMRI task data was analyzed first to identify brain regions (task clusters) where the groups significantly differed in activation for each attention component (alerting, orienting, executive). We then asked the question if there were any group differences in rsFC with those regions that differed in activation during the attention task. This was addressed by averaging the resting state fMRI time series in each task cluster; correlating this with the resting state fMRI time series at each voxel throughout the brain; and comparing the rsFC maps across groups. rsFC maps were generated and compared for each cluster for each attention component. This yielded brain regions (rsFC clusters) where the groups significantly differed in rsFC with the task clusters. Correlation analysis was then performed to assess for any group change in linear relationships between activation changes and rsFC changes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Attention dysfunction is a common but often undiagnosed cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease that significantly reduces quality of life. We sought to increase understanding of the mechanisms underlying attention dysfunction using functional neuroimaging. Functional MRI was acquired at two repeated sessions in the resting state and during the Attention Network Test, for 25 non-demented subjects with Parkinson's disease and 21 healthy controls. Behavioral and MRI contrasts were calculated for alerting, orienting, and executive control components of attention. Brain regions showing group differences in attention processing were used as seeds in a functional connectivity analysis of a separate resting state run. Parkinson's disease subjects showed more activation during increased executive challenge in four regions of the dorsal attention and frontoparietal networks, namely right frontal eye field, left and right intraparietal sulcus, and precuneus. In three regions we saw reduced resting state connectivity to the default mode network. Further, whereas higher task activation in the right intraparietal sulcus correlated with reduced resting state connectivity between right intraparietal sulcus and the precuneus in healthy controls, this relationship was absent in Parkinson's disease subjects. Our results suggest that a weakened interaction between the default mode and task positive networks might alter the way in which the executive response is processed in PD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus