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Respiratory distress associated with heterotopic gastrointestinal cysts of the oral cavity: A case report

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Heterotopic gastrointestinal cysts of the oral cavity are benign lesions usually discovered during infancy. Their pathogenesis is not very clear. They are rare congenital anomalies that result from remnants of foregut-derived epithelium in the head, neck, thorax or abdomen during embryonic development. The majority of these lesions occur in the anterior ventral surface of the tongue and extend to the floor of the mouth. They are confused clinically by surgeons in cases of head and neck masses in children as ranulas, dermoid and thyroglossal cysts, and lymphangioma. We report the case of a 28-day newborn with a 3.6 cm oval mass on the floor of the mouth causing difficulty eating and cyanosis during crying. Complete surgical excision was performed by an oral approach under general anesthesia. Microscopic examination revealed gastric epithelium with tall columnar mucous cells on the surface and numerous short closed crypts, resembling fundal glands and mature gastric epithelium.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical appearance of Heterotopic gastrointestinal cyst of the oral cavity presenting as a mass located inanterior ventral surface of the tongue with extension to the floor of mouth.
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fig1: Clinical appearance of Heterotopic gastrointestinal cyst of the oral cavity presenting as a mass located inanterior ventral surface of the tongue with extension to the floor of mouth.

Mentions: The patient is a 28-day-old boy from northern Mexico, product of a fourth gestation, with a history of prenatal supplementation of folic acid and iron, and born by caesarean section. The child was a full-term normal newborn with normal APGAR scores, weighing 3.87 kg, and 51.5 cm in length. He was referred because of a mass located in the anterior ventral surface of the tongue with extension to the floor of the mouth (Fig. 1). The mass was present from birth and gradually increased in size causing posterior displacement of the tongue, difficulty during feeding and cyanosis while crying. Laboratory tests on admission reported hemoglobin of 16.2, a white blood cell count of 12,500 with a differential count of 62.9% lymphocytes, and 17.8% neutrophils. Total bilirubin was 4.4 mg/dL, with a direct bilirubin of 0.4 mg/dL, and an indirect bilirubin of 4.0 mg/dL; phosphorus was 6.0 mg/dL, and coagulation tests showed a prothrombin time of 10.3 seconds, and a partial thromboplastin time of 38.3 seconds.


Respiratory distress associated with heterotopic gastrointestinal cysts of the oral cavity: A case report
Clinical appearance of Heterotopic gastrointestinal cyst of the oral cavity presenting as a mass located inanterior ventral surface of the tongue with extension to the floor of mouth.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5121137&req=5

fig1: Clinical appearance of Heterotopic gastrointestinal cyst of the oral cavity presenting as a mass located inanterior ventral surface of the tongue with extension to the floor of mouth.
Mentions: The patient is a 28-day-old boy from northern Mexico, product of a fourth gestation, with a history of prenatal supplementation of folic acid and iron, and born by caesarean section. The child was a full-term normal newborn with normal APGAR scores, weighing 3.87 kg, and 51.5 cm in length. He was referred because of a mass located in the anterior ventral surface of the tongue with extension to the floor of the mouth (Fig. 1). The mass was present from birth and gradually increased in size causing posterior displacement of the tongue, difficulty during feeding and cyanosis while crying. Laboratory tests on admission reported hemoglobin of 16.2, a white blood cell count of 12,500 with a differential count of 62.9% lymphocytes, and 17.8% neutrophils. Total bilirubin was 4.4 mg/dL, with a direct bilirubin of 0.4 mg/dL, and an indirect bilirubin of 4.0 mg/dL; phosphorus was 6.0 mg/dL, and coagulation tests showed a prothrombin time of 10.3 seconds, and a partial thromboplastin time of 38.3 seconds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Heterotopic gastrointestinal cysts of the oral cavity are benign lesions usually discovered during infancy. Their pathogenesis is not very clear. They are rare congenital anomalies that result from remnants of foregut-derived epithelium in the head, neck, thorax or abdomen during embryonic development. The majority of these lesions occur in the anterior ventral surface of the tongue and extend to the floor of the mouth. They are confused clinically by surgeons in cases of head and neck masses in children as ranulas, dermoid and thyroglossal cysts, and lymphangioma. We report the case of a 28-day newborn with a 3.6 cm oval mass on the floor of the mouth causing difficulty eating and cyanosis during crying. Complete surgical excision was performed by an oral approach under general anesthesia. Microscopic examination revealed gastric epithelium with tall columnar mucous cells on the surface and numerous short closed crypts, resembling fundal glands and mature gastric epithelium.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus