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Antibodies and tuberculosis

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health problem internationally, causing 9.6 million new cases and 1.5 million deaths worldwide in 2014. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is the only licensed vaccine against TB, but its protective effect does not extend to controlling the development of infectious pulmonary disease in adults. The development of a more effective vaccine against TB is therefore a pressing need for global health. Although it is established that cell-mediated immunity is necessary for the control of latent infection, the presupposition that such immunity is sufficient for vaccine-induced protection has recently been challenged. A greater understanding of protective immunity against TB is required to guide future vaccine strategies against TB.

In contrast to cell-mediated immunity, the human antibody response against M.tb is conventionally thought to exert little immune control over the course of infection. Humoral responses are prominent during active TB disease, and have even been postulated to contribute to immunopathology. However, there is evidence to suggest that specific antibodies may limit the dissemination of M.tb, and potentially also play a role in prevention of infection via mucosal immunity. Further, antibodies are now understood to confer protection against a range of intracellular pathogens by modulating immunity via Fc-receptor mediated phagocytosis. In this review, we will explore the evidence that antibody-mediated immunity could be reconsidered in the search for new vaccine strategies against TB.

No MeSH data available.


Antibodies modulate M.tb-macrophage interaction via FcR-mediated phagocytosis.
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fig1: Antibodies modulate M.tb-macrophage interaction via FcR-mediated phagocytosis.

Mentions: Severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model (SCID) mice are highly susceptible to infection with M.tb[76], In M.tb infected mice with partially treated infection, infusion of serum from immunized mice reduces bacillary load 100-fold and pulmonary infiltration by 3-fold [76]. Given the lack of T-cells in these mice, the mechanism of protection here is likely the role of antibody in immune serum [76]. These studies suggest a role for only anti-mycobacterial antibody containing serum in protection against TB independent of a B-cell mediated effect. Immune serum appears to mediate different effects compared to serum from non-immunized mice, most likely due to higher titres of antibodies against mycobacterial antigens.


Antibodies and tuberculosis
Antibodies modulate M.tb-macrophage interaction via FcR-mediated phagocytosis.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120988&req=5

fig1: Antibodies modulate M.tb-macrophage interaction via FcR-mediated phagocytosis.
Mentions: Severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model (SCID) mice are highly susceptible to infection with M.tb[76], In M.tb infected mice with partially treated infection, infusion of serum from immunized mice reduces bacillary load 100-fold and pulmonary infiltration by 3-fold [76]. Given the lack of T-cells in these mice, the mechanism of protection here is likely the role of antibody in immune serum [76]. These studies suggest a role for only anti-mycobacterial antibody containing serum in protection against TB independent of a B-cell mediated effect. Immune serum appears to mediate different effects compared to serum from non-immunized mice, most likely due to higher titres of antibodies against mycobacterial antigens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health problem internationally, causing 9.6 million new cases and 1.5 million deaths worldwide in 2014. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is the only licensed vaccine against TB, but its protective effect does not extend to controlling the development of infectious pulmonary disease in adults. The development of a more effective vaccine against TB is therefore a pressing need for global health. Although it is established that cell-mediated immunity is necessary for the control of latent infection, the presupposition that such immunity is sufficient for vaccine-induced protection has recently been challenged. A greater understanding of protective immunity against TB is required to guide future vaccine strategies against TB.

In contrast to cell-mediated immunity, the human antibody response against M.tb is conventionally thought to exert little immune control over the course of infection. Humoral responses are prominent during active TB disease, and have even been postulated to contribute to immunopathology. However, there is evidence to suggest that specific antibodies may limit the dissemination of M.tb, and potentially also play a role in prevention of infection via mucosal immunity. Further, antibodies are now understood to confer protection against a range of intracellular pathogens by modulating immunity via Fc-receptor mediated phagocytosis. In this review, we will explore the evidence that antibody-mediated immunity could be reconsidered in the search for new vaccine strategies against TB.

No MeSH data available.