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Liver graft hyperperfusion in the early postoperative period promotes hepatic regeneration 2 weeks after living donor liver transplantation

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ABSTRACT

Hepatic regeneration is essential to meet the metabolic demands of partial liver grafts following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Hepatic regeneration is promoted by portal hyperperfusion of partial grafts, which produces shear stress on the sinusoidal endothelium. Hepatic regeneration is difficult to assess within the first 2 weeks after LDLT as the size of liver graft could be overestimated in the presence of postsurgical graft edema. In this study, we evaluated the effects of graft hyperperfusion on the rate of hepatic regeneration 2 weeks after LDLT by measuring hepatic hemodynamic parameters. Thirty-six patients undergoing LDLT were enrolled in this study. Hepatic hemodynamic parameters including peak portal venous flow velocity (PVV) were measured using spectral Doppler ultrasonography on postoperative day 1. Subsequently, we calculated the ratio of each velocity to 100 g of the initial graft weight (GW) obtained immediately after graft retrieval on the day of LDLT. Ratios of GW to recipient weight (GRWR) and to standard liver volume (GW/SLV) were also obtained. The hepatic regeneration rate was defined as the ratio of the regenerated volume measured using computed tomographic volumetry at postoperative week 2 to the initial GW. Correlations of the hemodynamic parameters, GRWR, and GW/SLV with the hepatic regeneration rate were assessed using a linear regression analysis. The liver grafts regenerated to approximately 1.7 times their initial GW (1.7 ± 0.3 [mean ± standard deviation]). PVV/100 g of GW (r2 = 0.224, β1 [slope coefficient] = 2.105, P = 0.004) and velocities of the hepatic artery and vein per 100 g of GW positively correlated with the hepatic regeneration rate, whereas GRWR (r2 = 0.407, β1 = –81.149, P < 0.001) and GW/SLV (r2 = 0.541, β1 = –2.184, P < 0.001) negatively correlated with the hepatic regeneration rate. Graft hyperperfusion demonstrated by increased hepatic vascular velocities and a small-sized graft in the early postoperative period contributes to hepatic regeneration 2 weeks after LDLT.

No MeSH data available.


Measurement of PVV (A), PSV and EDV (B), and HVV (C) using spectral Doppler ultrasonography 1 day after living donor liver transplantation. RI is calculated by (PSV–EDV)/PSV. EDV = end diastolic velocity of the hepatic artery, HVV = peak hepatic venous flow velocity, PSV = peak systolic velocity of the hepatic artery, PVV = peak portal venous flow velocity, RI = resistive index.
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Figure 1: Measurement of PVV (A), PSV and EDV (B), and HVV (C) using spectral Doppler ultrasonography 1 day after living donor liver transplantation. RI is calculated by (PSV–EDV)/PSV. EDV = end diastolic velocity of the hepatic artery, HVV = peak hepatic venous flow velocity, PSV = peak systolic velocity of the hepatic artery, PVV = peak portal venous flow velocity, RI = resistive index.

Mentions: One day after LDLT, peak portal venous flow velocity (PVV), peak systolic (PSV), and end diastolic velocities (EDV) of the hepatic artery, as well as peak hepatic venous flow velocity (HVV) were measured under spectral Doppler ultrasonography using a 1 to 5 MHz curved array transducer (C5-1, Philips Ultrasound, Bothell, WA) equipped to the diagnostic ultrasound system (iU22, Philips Ultrasound) (Fig. 1A–C). Next, we calculated the ratios of each velocity to 100 g of the initial GW which was obtained immediately after graft retrieval on the day of LDLT. Resistive index was calculated by dividing the difference between the PSV and EDV by the PSV ([PSV – EDV]/PSV). Before measurements, the patients were acclimatized on the bed for at least 15 minutes.


Liver graft hyperperfusion in the early postoperative period promotes hepatic regeneration 2 weeks after living donor liver transplantation
Measurement of PVV (A), PSV and EDV (B), and HVV (C) using spectral Doppler ultrasonography 1 day after living donor liver transplantation. RI is calculated by (PSV–EDV)/PSV. EDV = end diastolic velocity of the hepatic artery, HVV = peak hepatic venous flow velocity, PSV = peak systolic velocity of the hepatic artery, PVV = peak portal venous flow velocity, RI = resistive index.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120938&req=5

Figure 1: Measurement of PVV (A), PSV and EDV (B), and HVV (C) using spectral Doppler ultrasonography 1 day after living donor liver transplantation. RI is calculated by (PSV–EDV)/PSV. EDV = end diastolic velocity of the hepatic artery, HVV = peak hepatic venous flow velocity, PSV = peak systolic velocity of the hepatic artery, PVV = peak portal venous flow velocity, RI = resistive index.
Mentions: One day after LDLT, peak portal venous flow velocity (PVV), peak systolic (PSV), and end diastolic velocities (EDV) of the hepatic artery, as well as peak hepatic venous flow velocity (HVV) were measured under spectral Doppler ultrasonography using a 1 to 5 MHz curved array transducer (C5-1, Philips Ultrasound, Bothell, WA) equipped to the diagnostic ultrasound system (iU22, Philips Ultrasound) (Fig. 1A–C). Next, we calculated the ratios of each velocity to 100 g of the initial GW which was obtained immediately after graft retrieval on the day of LDLT. Resistive index was calculated by dividing the difference between the PSV and EDV by the PSV ([PSV – EDV]/PSV). Before measurements, the patients were acclimatized on the bed for at least 15 minutes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Hepatic regeneration is essential to meet the metabolic demands of partial liver grafts following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Hepatic regeneration is promoted by portal hyperperfusion of partial grafts, which produces shear stress on the sinusoidal endothelium. Hepatic regeneration is difficult to assess within the first 2 weeks after LDLT as the size of liver graft could be overestimated in the presence of postsurgical graft edema. In this study, we evaluated the effects of graft hyperperfusion on the rate of hepatic regeneration 2 weeks after LDLT by measuring hepatic hemodynamic parameters. Thirty-six patients undergoing LDLT were enrolled in this study. Hepatic hemodynamic parameters including peak portal venous flow velocity (PVV) were measured using spectral Doppler ultrasonography on postoperative day 1. Subsequently, we calculated the ratio of each velocity to 100 g of the initial graft weight (GW) obtained immediately after graft retrieval on the day of LDLT. Ratios of GW to recipient weight (GRWR) and to standard liver volume (GW/SLV) were also obtained. The hepatic regeneration rate was defined as the ratio of the regenerated volume measured using computed tomographic volumetry at postoperative week 2 to the initial GW. Correlations of the hemodynamic parameters, GRWR, and GW/SLV with the hepatic regeneration rate were assessed using a linear regression analysis. The liver grafts regenerated to approximately 1.7 times their initial GW (1.7 ± 0.3 [mean ± standard deviation]). PVV/100 g of GW (r2 = 0.224, β1 [slope coefficient] = 2.105, P = 0.004) and velocities of the hepatic artery and vein per 100 g of GW positively correlated with the hepatic regeneration rate, whereas GRWR (r2 = 0.407, β1 = –81.149, P < 0.001) and GW/SLV (r2 = 0.541, β1 = –2.184, P < 0.001) negatively correlated with the hepatic regeneration rate. Graft hyperperfusion demonstrated by increased hepatic vascular velocities and a small-sized graft in the early postoperative period contributes to hepatic regeneration 2 weeks after LDLT.

No MeSH data available.