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Soluble vascular cell adhesion molecular-1 is a potential biological indicator of hemophilic arthropathy

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Hemophilic arthropathy is the most common chronic complication in patients with hemophilia. The pathogenesis of hemophilic arthropathy involves the inflammatory processes associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Determining the severity and/or progression of joint damage is crucial when evaluating the effect of treatment modalities. Identifying reliable biomarkers in the peripheral blood of patients with hemophilic arthropathy may be beneficial in clinical practice. Circulating soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), E-selectin, and P-selectin levels are elevated in patients with RA. Our study investigated whether these soluble adhesion molecules can be used as biological indicators in the course of joint damage in patients with hemophilia A.

Patients with hemophilia A (mild, moderate, and severe) were enrolled. The plasma levels of sVCAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin in patients with hemophilia A and control were measured using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Joint damages were evaluated using Pettersson scores.

No statistically significant differences were observed in E-selectin and P-selectin levels between patients and controls. The sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher in patients with hemophilia A than in controls. The differences remained significant in patients with severe hemophilia A but not in patients with mild or moderate hemophilia A. The degree of hemophilic arthropathy was evaluated using Pettersson scores, and a score higher than 5 indicated marked arthropathy. Patients with more than 1 joint with marked arthropathy showed significantly higher sVCAM-1 levels.

sVCAM-1 levels in patients with hemophilia A are associated with the severity of hemophilic arthropathy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) The plasma sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher in patients with hemophilia A (n = 35) than in controls (n = 20; ∗∗P = 0.0046). (B) The plasma sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher in patients with severe hemophilia A (n = 22) than in controls (n = 20; ∗∗P = 0.0047) but was not significantly different between controls and patients with mild (n = 9) or moderate (n = 4) hemophilia A.
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Figure 1: (A) The plasma sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher in patients with hemophilia A (n = 35) than in controls (n = 20; ∗∗P = 0.0046). (B) The plasma sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher in patients with severe hemophilia A (n = 22) than in controls (n = 20; ∗∗P = 0.0047) but was not significantly different between controls and patients with mild (n = 9) or moderate (n = 4) hemophilia A.

Mentions: sVCAM-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with hemophilia A than in controls (683.0 ± 392.3 vs 475.6 ± 85.75 ng/mL). Hemophilia A can be classified as mild, moderate, and severe forms according to the residual activity of clotting factor VIII. sVCAM-1 levels were 533.2 ± 161.5 ng/mL in patients with mild hemophilia A, 446.9 ± 40.34 ng/mL in those with moderate hemophilia A, and 787.3 ± 455.4 ng/mL in those with severe hemophilia A. Significantly elevated sVCAM-1 levels were noted in patients with severe hemophilia A relative to those in controls. However, no significant differences were observed in sVCAM-1 levels between patients with mild or moderate hemophilia A and controls (Fig. 1 and Table 1). Previous studies have shown that the sVCAM-1 level is associated with hypertension, late-stage ovarian cancer, colorectal cancer, microalbuminuria diabetes, and liver fibrosis.[14–19] Our study population included 3 patients with hypertension, 1 patient with hepatitis B, and 17 patients with hepatitis C. Most patients with hepatitis C (16/17) were cured (defined as viral RNA level less than 0.03 KIU/mL). Excluding those patients with hypertension (n = 3), hepatitis B (n = 1), and hepatitis C with viral RNA level higher than 0.03 KIU/mL (n = 1), the sVCAM-1 level remained significantly higher in all patients with hemophilia A and severe hemophilia A than in controls (Fig. 2).


Soluble vascular cell adhesion molecular-1 is a potential biological indicator of hemophilic arthropathy
(A) The plasma sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher in patients with hemophilia A (n = 35) than in controls (n = 20; ∗∗P = 0.0046). (B) The plasma sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher in patients with severe hemophilia A (n = 22) than in controls (n = 20; ∗∗P = 0.0047) but was not significantly different between controls and patients with mild (n = 9) or moderate (n = 4) hemophilia A.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120929&req=5

Figure 1: (A) The plasma sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher in patients with hemophilia A (n = 35) than in controls (n = 20; ∗∗P = 0.0046). (B) The plasma sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher in patients with severe hemophilia A (n = 22) than in controls (n = 20; ∗∗P = 0.0047) but was not significantly different between controls and patients with mild (n = 9) or moderate (n = 4) hemophilia A.
Mentions: sVCAM-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with hemophilia A than in controls (683.0 ± 392.3 vs 475.6 ± 85.75 ng/mL). Hemophilia A can be classified as mild, moderate, and severe forms according to the residual activity of clotting factor VIII. sVCAM-1 levels were 533.2 ± 161.5 ng/mL in patients with mild hemophilia A, 446.9 ± 40.34 ng/mL in those with moderate hemophilia A, and 787.3 ± 455.4 ng/mL in those with severe hemophilia A. Significantly elevated sVCAM-1 levels were noted in patients with severe hemophilia A relative to those in controls. However, no significant differences were observed in sVCAM-1 levels between patients with mild or moderate hemophilia A and controls (Fig. 1 and Table 1). Previous studies have shown that the sVCAM-1 level is associated with hypertension, late-stage ovarian cancer, colorectal cancer, microalbuminuria diabetes, and liver fibrosis.[14–19] Our study population included 3 patients with hypertension, 1 patient with hepatitis B, and 17 patients with hepatitis C. Most patients with hepatitis C (16/17) were cured (defined as viral RNA level less than 0.03 KIU/mL). Excluding those patients with hypertension (n = 3), hepatitis B (n = 1), and hepatitis C with viral RNA level higher than 0.03 KIU/mL (n = 1), the sVCAM-1 level remained significantly higher in all patients with hemophilia A and severe hemophilia A than in controls (Fig. 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Hemophilic arthropathy is the most common chronic complication in patients with hemophilia. The pathogenesis of hemophilic arthropathy involves the inflammatory processes associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Determining the severity and/or progression of joint damage is crucial when evaluating the effect of treatment modalities. Identifying reliable biomarkers in the peripheral blood of patients with hemophilic arthropathy may be beneficial in clinical practice. Circulating soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), E-selectin, and P-selectin levels are elevated in patients with RA. Our study investigated whether these soluble adhesion molecules can be used as biological indicators in the course of joint damage in patients with hemophilia A.

Patients with hemophilia A (mild, moderate, and severe) were enrolled. The plasma levels of sVCAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin in patients with hemophilia A and control were measured using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Joint damages were evaluated using Pettersson scores.

No statistically significant differences were observed in E-selectin and P-selectin levels between patients and controls. The sVCAM-1 level was significantly higher in patients with hemophilia A than in controls. The differences remained significant in patients with severe hemophilia A but not in patients with mild or moderate hemophilia A. The degree of hemophilic arthropathy was evaluated using Pettersson scores, and a score higher than 5 indicated marked arthropathy. Patients with more than 1 joint with marked arthropathy showed significantly higher sVCAM-1 levels.

sVCAM-1 levels in patients with hemophilia A are associated with the severity of hemophilic arthropathy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus