Limits...
The relationship between heart rate and mortality of patients with acute coronary syndromes in the coronary intervention era

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background:: Most of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) were receiving intervention treatment a high overall rate of coronary angiography in the modern medical practice.

Background:: Consequently, we conduct a review to determine the heart rate (HR) on the prognosis of ACS in the coronary intervention era.

Methods:: PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library was systematically searched up to May 2016 using the search terms “heart rate,” “acute coronary syndrome,” “acute myocardial infarction,” “ST elevation myocardial infarction,” “non-ST-segment elevation.” The outcome of interest was all-cause mortality. All analyses were performed using Review Manager.

Results:: Database searches retrieved 2324 citations. Eleven studies enrolling 156,374 patients were included. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in the elevated HR group compared to the lower HR group (pooled RR 2.04, 95%CI 1.80–2.30, P < 0.0001). Individuals with elevated admission HR had increased risk of long-term mortality (Pooled RR = 1.63, 95%CI 1.27–2.10, P = 0.008) compared to lower admission HR. The pooled results showed elevated discharge and resting HR were related to increased mortality of patients with ACS (pooled RR 1.88, 95% CI 1.02–3.47, P = 0.04; pooled RR 2.14, 95%CI 1.37–3.33, P < 0.0001, respectively).

Conclusion:: Elevated HR may increase the mortality of ACS patients in the percutaneous coronary intervention era.

No MeSH data available.


(A) The relationship between admission heart rate and in-hospital mortality by omitting 1 study. (B) The relationship between admission heart rate and long-term mortality by omitting 1 study. (C) The relationship between discharge heart rate and long-term mortality by omitting 1 study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120926&req=5

Figure 7: (A) The relationship between admission heart rate and in-hospital mortality by omitting 1 study. (B) The relationship between admission heart rate and long-term mortality by omitting 1 study. (C) The relationship between discharge heart rate and long-term mortality by omitting 1 study.

Mentions: To analyze sensitivity, the primary results were not influenced by omitting 1 study except the resting heart rate and long-term mortality (Fig. 7A–C).


The relationship between heart rate and mortality of patients with acute coronary syndromes in the coronary intervention era
(A) The relationship between admission heart rate and in-hospital mortality by omitting 1 study. (B) The relationship between admission heart rate and long-term mortality by omitting 1 study. (C) The relationship between discharge heart rate and long-term mortality by omitting 1 study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120926&req=5

Figure 7: (A) The relationship between admission heart rate and in-hospital mortality by omitting 1 study. (B) The relationship between admission heart rate and long-term mortality by omitting 1 study. (C) The relationship between discharge heart rate and long-term mortality by omitting 1 study.
Mentions: To analyze sensitivity, the primary results were not influenced by omitting 1 study except the resting heart rate and long-term mortality (Fig. 7A–C).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background:: Most of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) were receiving intervention treatment a high overall rate of coronary angiography in the modern medical practice.

Background:: Consequently, we conduct a review to determine the heart rate (HR) on the prognosis of ACS in the coronary intervention era.

Methods:: PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library was systematically searched up to May 2016 using the search terms “heart rate,” “acute coronary syndrome,” “acute myocardial infarction,” “ST elevation myocardial infarction,” “non-ST-segment elevation.” The outcome of interest was all-cause mortality. All analyses were performed using Review Manager.

Results:: Database searches retrieved 2324 citations. Eleven studies enrolling 156,374 patients were included. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in the elevated HR group compared to the lower HR group (pooled RR 2.04, 95%CI 1.80–2.30, P < 0.0001). Individuals with elevated admission HR had increased risk of long-term mortality (Pooled RR = 1.63, 95%CI 1.27–2.10, P = 0.008) compared to lower admission HR. The pooled results showed elevated discharge and resting HR were related to increased mortality of patients with ACS (pooled RR 1.88, 95% CI 1.02–3.47, P = 0.04; pooled RR 2.14, 95%CI 1.37–3.33, P < 0.0001, respectively).

Conclusion:: Elevated HR may increase the mortality of ACS patients in the percutaneous coronary intervention era.

No MeSH data available.