Limits...
Characterization of radiographic features of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Radiographic features of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis were retrospectively analyzed in a total of 17 patients treated for this condition at the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University from June 2005 to March 2012.

To investigate the radiographic features, pelvic compensatory mechanisms, and possible underlying etiologies of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis.

To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report concerning the characteristics of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis.

The Taillard index and the lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), sacrum slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) were determined on lateral X-ray images, and the angular displacement was analyzed on flexion–extension X-ray images. Correlation between LL and various pelvic parameters and correlation between Taillard index and angular displacement were assessed by Pearson correlation analysis.

A total of 20 cases of isthmic spondylolisthesis and 14 of degenerative spondylolisthesis were retrospectively studied in 17 patients. The Taillard index and the angular displacement in the lower vertebrae were both larger than those in the upper vertebrae. Statistical analysis revealed that LL was correlated with PI and PT, whereas PI was correlated with PT and SS. However, no correlation was identified between Taillard index and angular displacement.

In consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis, the degree of vertebral slip and the angular displacement of the lower vertebrae were both greater than those of the upper vertebrae, indicating that the compensatory mechanism of the pelvis plays an important role in maintaining sagittal balance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The measurement of the lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), and sacrum slope (SS).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120916&req=5

Figure 2: The measurement of the lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), and sacrum slope (SS).

Mentions: The lateral X-ray images for individual patients were retrieved from our Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS). The Taillard index was defined as the relative displacement distance between the involved vertebrae divided by the horizontal length of the upper vertebral body (Fig. 1). The LL was the angle between the L1 endplate and S1 endplate. The pelvic incidence (PI) was denoted as the angle between the vertical line of S1 endplate and the line connecting midpoint of S1 endplate to midpoint of the femoral heads. The sacrum slope (SS) was defined as the angle between the S1 endplate and the horizontal line, while the pelvic tilt (PT) was the angle formed by the vertical line and the line connecting the midpoint of S1 endplate to the midpoint of the femoral heads (Fig. 2). The displacement between the upper and lower intervertebral space was determined on flexion–extension dynamic X-ray radiographs (Fig. 3).


Characterization of radiographic features of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis
The measurement of the lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), and sacrum slope (SS).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120916&req=5

Figure 2: The measurement of the lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), and sacrum slope (SS).
Mentions: The lateral X-ray images for individual patients were retrieved from our Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS). The Taillard index was defined as the relative displacement distance between the involved vertebrae divided by the horizontal length of the upper vertebral body (Fig. 1). The LL was the angle between the L1 endplate and S1 endplate. The pelvic incidence (PI) was denoted as the angle between the vertical line of S1 endplate and the line connecting midpoint of S1 endplate to midpoint of the femoral heads. The sacrum slope (SS) was defined as the angle between the S1 endplate and the horizontal line, while the pelvic tilt (PT) was the angle formed by the vertical line and the line connecting the midpoint of S1 endplate to the midpoint of the femoral heads (Fig. 2). The displacement between the upper and lower intervertebral space was determined on flexion–extension dynamic X-ray radiographs (Fig. 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Radiographic features of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis were retrospectively analyzed in a total of 17 patients treated for this condition at the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University from June 2005 to March 2012.

To investigate the radiographic features, pelvic compensatory mechanisms, and possible underlying etiologies of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis.

To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report concerning the characteristics of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis.

The Taillard index and the lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), sacrum slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) were determined on lateral X-ray images, and the angular displacement was analyzed on flexion–extension X-ray images. Correlation between LL and various pelvic parameters and correlation between Taillard index and angular displacement were assessed by Pearson correlation analysis.

A total of 20 cases of isthmic spondylolisthesis and 14 of degenerative spondylolisthesis were retrospectively studied in 17 patients. The Taillard index and the angular displacement in the lower vertebrae were both larger than those in the upper vertebrae. Statistical analysis revealed that LL was correlated with PI and PT, whereas PI was correlated with PT and SS. However, no correlation was identified between Taillard index and angular displacement.

In consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis, the degree of vertebral slip and the angular displacement of the lower vertebrae were both greater than those of the upper vertebrae, indicating that the compensatory mechanism of the pelvis plays an important role in maintaining sagittal balance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus