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Visual attention is available at a task-relevant location rapidly after a saccade

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Maintaining attention at a task-relevant spatial location while making eye-movements necessitates a rapid, saccade-synchronized shift of attentional modulation from the neuronal population representing the task-relevant location before the saccade to the one representing it after the saccade. Currently, the precise time at which spatial attention becomes fully allocated to the task-relevant location after the saccade remains unclear. Using a fine-grained temporal analysis of human peri-saccadic detection performance in an attention task, we show that spatial attention is fully available at the task-relevant location within 30 milliseconds after the saccade. Subjects tracked the attentional target veridically throughout our task: i.e. they almost never responded to non-target stimuli. Spatial attention and saccadic processing therefore co-ordinate well to ensure that relevant locations are attentionally enhanced soon after the beginning of each eye fixation.

Doi:: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.001

No MeSH data available.


Post-saccadic recovery of performance plotted with a smaller fixation window.This figure is identical to Figure 2, except that we only included trials where the horizontal and vertical eye-positions did not diverge by more than 0.5° during fixation from their median values (see 'Materials and methods'). Estimated recovery times are 20 ms in A and 30 ms for both tasks in B. Despite the much smaller fixation window, A and B include 59% and 78% of the trials in Figure 2A and B respectively. Related to Figure 2A and B.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.014
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fig2s5: Post-saccadic recovery of performance plotted with a smaller fixation window.This figure is identical to Figure 2, except that we only included trials where the horizontal and vertical eye-positions did not diverge by more than 0.5° during fixation from their median values (see 'Materials and methods'). Estimated recovery times are 20 ms in A and 30 ms for both tasks in B. Despite the much smaller fixation window, A and B include 59% and 78% of the trials in Figure 2A and B respectively. Related to Figure 2A and B.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.014

Mentions: (A) Detection-performance (hit-rate) of motion-direction drops around the time of the saccade and recovers within 30 ms after the saccade. The figure shows the mean detection-performance (and 95% confidence bands) for all trials pooled over 8 subjects calculated in non-overlapping 10 ms time-bins of the abscissa (time of target-change relative to saccade offset). The inset shows the same data, focusing on the time between −100 and 100 ms. Data from individual subjects show little inter-individual variability in the time-course of recovery (Figure 2—figure supplement 1). The triangle indicates the earliest time (30 ms) at which performance is statistically indistinguishable from that over the 100 to 500 ms time-period (using Boschloo’s exact test; see 'Materials and methods'). The dashed vertical line indicates the mean time of fixation-point offset and the stippled vertical line indicates the mean saccade onset time. See also Figure 2—figure supplement 1 and 3. (B) Similar results were obtained when two different task-difficulties were used (data pooled over 5 subjects). The data from the higher-difficulty task (in red) show that the rapid recovery is not an artifact of a ceiling effect on performance. Data plotted using 20 ms time-bins. Figure conventions as in Figure 2A. See also Figure 2—figure supplement 2 for data from individual subjects. Figure 2—figure supplement 4 and 5 replot the same data as in Figure 2A and B and in the same format, but Figure 2—figure supplement 4 uses the time of target-change relative to saccade onset and Figure 2—figure supplement 5 only includes trials where a fixation window of 0.5° was used (see corresponding legends for details).


Visual attention is available at a task-relevant location rapidly after a saccade
Post-saccadic recovery of performance plotted with a smaller fixation window.This figure is identical to Figure 2, except that we only included trials where the horizontal and vertical eye-positions did not diverge by more than 0.5° during fixation from their median values (see 'Materials and methods'). Estimated recovery times are 20 ms in A and 30 ms for both tasks in B. Despite the much smaller fixation window, A and B include 59% and 78% of the trials in Figure 2A and B respectively. Related to Figure 2A and B.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.014
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120882&req=5

fig2s5: Post-saccadic recovery of performance plotted with a smaller fixation window.This figure is identical to Figure 2, except that we only included trials where the horizontal and vertical eye-positions did not diverge by more than 0.5° during fixation from their median values (see 'Materials and methods'). Estimated recovery times are 20 ms in A and 30 ms for both tasks in B. Despite the much smaller fixation window, A and B include 59% and 78% of the trials in Figure 2A and B respectively. Related to Figure 2A and B.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.014
Mentions: (A) Detection-performance (hit-rate) of motion-direction drops around the time of the saccade and recovers within 30 ms after the saccade. The figure shows the mean detection-performance (and 95% confidence bands) for all trials pooled over 8 subjects calculated in non-overlapping 10 ms time-bins of the abscissa (time of target-change relative to saccade offset). The inset shows the same data, focusing on the time between −100 and 100 ms. Data from individual subjects show little inter-individual variability in the time-course of recovery (Figure 2—figure supplement 1). The triangle indicates the earliest time (30 ms) at which performance is statistically indistinguishable from that over the 100 to 500 ms time-period (using Boschloo’s exact test; see 'Materials and methods'). The dashed vertical line indicates the mean time of fixation-point offset and the stippled vertical line indicates the mean saccade onset time. See also Figure 2—figure supplement 1 and 3. (B) Similar results were obtained when two different task-difficulties were used (data pooled over 5 subjects). The data from the higher-difficulty task (in red) show that the rapid recovery is not an artifact of a ceiling effect on performance. Data plotted using 20 ms time-bins. Figure conventions as in Figure 2A. See also Figure 2—figure supplement 2 for data from individual subjects. Figure 2—figure supplement 4 and 5 replot the same data as in Figure 2A and B and in the same format, but Figure 2—figure supplement 4 uses the time of target-change relative to saccade onset and Figure 2—figure supplement 5 only includes trials where a fixation window of 0.5° was used (see corresponding legends for details).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Maintaining attention at a task-relevant spatial location while making eye-movements necessitates a rapid, saccade-synchronized shift of attentional modulation from the neuronal population representing the task-relevant location before the saccade to the one representing it after the saccade. Currently, the precise time at which spatial attention becomes fully allocated to the task-relevant location after the saccade remains unclear. Using a fine-grained temporal analysis of human peri-saccadic detection performance in an attention task, we show that spatial attention is fully available at the task-relevant location within 30 milliseconds after the saccade. Subjects tracked the attentional target veridically throughout our task: i.e. they almost never responded to non-target stimuli. Spatial attention and saccadic processing therefore co-ordinate well to ensure that relevant locations are attentionally enhanced soon after the beginning of each eye fixation.

Doi:: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.001

No MeSH data available.