Limits...
Visual attention is available at a task-relevant location rapidly after a saccade

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Maintaining attention at a task-relevant spatial location while making eye-movements necessitates a rapid, saccade-synchronized shift of attentional modulation from the neuronal population representing the task-relevant location before the saccade to the one representing it after the saccade. Currently, the precise time at which spatial attention becomes fully allocated to the task-relevant location after the saccade remains unclear. Using a fine-grained temporal analysis of human peri-saccadic detection performance in an attention task, we show that spatial attention is fully available at the task-relevant location within 30 milliseconds after the saccade. Subjects tracked the attentional target veridically throughout our task: i.e. they almost never responded to non-target stimuli. Spatial attention and saccadic processing therefore co-ordinate well to ensure that relevant locations are attentionally enhanced soon after the beginning of each eye fixation.

Doi:: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.001

No MeSH data available.


Individual subjects – rapid post-saccadic recovery of performance for two task difficulties.Data from the five individual subjects whose pooled data appear in Figure 2B. Triangles indicate time at which performance reaches 80% of baseline (see 'Materials and methods'); the values of this time are 25, 24, 29, 30, and 25 ms for the easier task and 29, 40, 32, 30, and 21 ms for the harder task for subjects JV, LV, MK, MS and TY respectively. All other conventions as in Figure 2B. Related to Figure 2B.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.011
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120882&req=5

fig2s2: Individual subjects – rapid post-saccadic recovery of performance for two task difficulties.Data from the five individual subjects whose pooled data appear in Figure 2B. Triangles indicate time at which performance reaches 80% of baseline (see 'Materials and methods'); the values of this time are 25, 24, 29, 30, and 25 ms for the easier task and 29, 40, 32, 30, and 21 ms for the harder task for subjects JV, LV, MK, MS and TY respectively. All other conventions as in Figure 2B. Related to Figure 2B.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.011

Mentions: (A) Detection-performance (hit-rate) of motion-direction drops around the time of the saccade and recovers within 30 ms after the saccade. The figure shows the mean detection-performance (and 95% confidence bands) for all trials pooled over 8 subjects calculated in non-overlapping 10 ms time-bins of the abscissa (time of target-change relative to saccade offset). The inset shows the same data, focusing on the time between −100 and 100 ms. Data from individual subjects show little inter-individual variability in the time-course of recovery (Figure 2—figure supplement 1). The triangle indicates the earliest time (30 ms) at which performance is statistically indistinguishable from that over the 100 to 500 ms time-period (using Boschloo’s exact test; see 'Materials and methods'). The dashed vertical line indicates the mean time of fixation-point offset and the stippled vertical line indicates the mean saccade onset time. See also Figure 2—figure supplement 1 and 3. (B) Similar results were obtained when two different task-difficulties were used (data pooled over 5 subjects). The data from the higher-difficulty task (in red) show that the rapid recovery is not an artifact of a ceiling effect on performance. Data plotted using 20 ms time-bins. Figure conventions as in Figure 2A. See also Figure 2—figure supplement 2 for data from individual subjects. Figure 2—figure supplement 4 and 5 replot the same data as in Figure 2A and B and in the same format, but Figure 2—figure supplement 4 uses the time of target-change relative to saccade onset and Figure 2—figure supplement 5 only includes trials where a fixation window of 0.5° was used (see corresponding legends for details).


Visual attention is available at a task-relevant location rapidly after a saccade
Individual subjects – rapid post-saccadic recovery of performance for two task difficulties.Data from the five individual subjects whose pooled data appear in Figure 2B. Triangles indicate time at which performance reaches 80% of baseline (see 'Materials and methods'); the values of this time are 25, 24, 29, 30, and 25 ms for the easier task and 29, 40, 32, 30, and 21 ms for the harder task for subjects JV, LV, MK, MS and TY respectively. All other conventions as in Figure 2B. Related to Figure 2B.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.011
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120882&req=5

fig2s2: Individual subjects – rapid post-saccadic recovery of performance for two task difficulties.Data from the five individual subjects whose pooled data appear in Figure 2B. Triangles indicate time at which performance reaches 80% of baseline (see 'Materials and methods'); the values of this time are 25, 24, 29, 30, and 25 ms for the easier task and 29, 40, 32, 30, and 21 ms for the harder task for subjects JV, LV, MK, MS and TY respectively. All other conventions as in Figure 2B. Related to Figure 2B.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.011
Mentions: (A) Detection-performance (hit-rate) of motion-direction drops around the time of the saccade and recovers within 30 ms after the saccade. The figure shows the mean detection-performance (and 95% confidence bands) for all trials pooled over 8 subjects calculated in non-overlapping 10 ms time-bins of the abscissa (time of target-change relative to saccade offset). The inset shows the same data, focusing on the time between −100 and 100 ms. Data from individual subjects show little inter-individual variability in the time-course of recovery (Figure 2—figure supplement 1). The triangle indicates the earliest time (30 ms) at which performance is statistically indistinguishable from that over the 100 to 500 ms time-period (using Boschloo’s exact test; see 'Materials and methods'). The dashed vertical line indicates the mean time of fixation-point offset and the stippled vertical line indicates the mean saccade onset time. See also Figure 2—figure supplement 1 and 3. (B) Similar results were obtained when two different task-difficulties were used (data pooled over 5 subjects). The data from the higher-difficulty task (in red) show that the rapid recovery is not an artifact of a ceiling effect on performance. Data plotted using 20 ms time-bins. Figure conventions as in Figure 2A. See also Figure 2—figure supplement 2 for data from individual subjects. Figure 2—figure supplement 4 and 5 replot the same data as in Figure 2A and B and in the same format, but Figure 2—figure supplement 4 uses the time of target-change relative to saccade onset and Figure 2—figure supplement 5 only includes trials where a fixation window of 0.5° was used (see corresponding legends for details).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Maintaining attention at a task-relevant spatial location while making eye-movements necessitates a rapid, saccade-synchronized shift of attentional modulation from the neuronal population representing the task-relevant location before the saccade to the one representing it after the saccade. Currently, the precise time at which spatial attention becomes fully allocated to the task-relevant location after the saccade remains unclear. Using a fine-grained temporal analysis of human peri-saccadic detection performance in an attention task, we show that spatial attention is fully available at the task-relevant location within 30 milliseconds after the saccade. Subjects tracked the attentional target veridically throughout our task: i.e. they almost never responded to non-target stimuli. Spatial attention and saccadic processing therefore co-ordinate well to ensure that relevant locations are attentionally enhanced soon after the beginning of each eye fixation.

Doi:: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18009.001

No MeSH data available.