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Calcium orthophosphate coatings, films and layers

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ABSTRACT

In surgical disciplines, where bones have to be repaired, augmented or improved, bone substitutes are essential. Therefore, an interest has dramatically increased in application of synthetic bone grafts. As various interactions among cells, surrounding tissues and implanted biomaterials always occur at the interfaces, the surface properties of the implants are of the paramount importance in determining both the biological response to implants and the material response to the physiological conditions. Hence, a surface engineering is aimed to modify both the biomaterials, themselves, and biological responses through introducing desirable changes to the surface properties of the implants but still maintaining their bulk mechanical properties. To fulfill these requirements, a special class of artificial bone grafts has been introduced in 1976. It is composed of various mechanically stable (therefore, suitable for load bearing applications) biomaterials and/or bio-devices with calcium orthophosphate coatings, films and layers on their surfaces to both improve interactions with the surrounding tissues and provide an adequate bonding to bones. Many production techniques of calcium orthophosphate coatings, films and layers have been already invented and new promising techniques are continuously investigated. These specialized coatings, films and layers used to improve the surface properties of various types of artificial implants are the topic of this review.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/2194-0517-1-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


Time-dependent plasma-sprayed HA coating. This figure shows how a plasma-sprayed HA coating on a porous titanium (dark bars) dependent on the implantation time will improve the interfacial bond strength compared to uncoated porous titanium (light bars). Reprinted from Hench (1991) with permission.
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Fig12: Time-dependent plasma-sprayed HA coating. This figure shows how a plasma-sprayed HA coating on a porous titanium (dark bars) dependent on the implantation time will improve the interfacial bond strength compared to uncoated porous titanium (light bars). Reprinted from Hench (1991) with permission.

Mentions: In biomedical applications, bone grafts are usually much thicker than coatings, films or layers applied to them. Nevertheless, the coated implants combine the surface biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium orthophosphates with the core strength of strong substrates (Figure‚ÄČ12). The clinical results for calcium orthophosphate-coated implants reveal that they have much longer life times after implantation than uncoated devices, and therefore, they are particularly beneficial for younger patients (Capello et al. 1997). Their biomedical properties are approaching those of bioactive glass-coated implants (Wheeler et al. 2001; Mistry et al. 2011).Figure 12


Calcium orthophosphate coatings, films and layers
Time-dependent plasma-sprayed HA coating. This figure shows how a plasma-sprayed HA coating on a porous titanium (dark bars) dependent on the implantation time will improve the interfacial bond strength compared to uncoated porous titanium (light bars). Reprinted from Hench (1991) with permission.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120666&req=5

Fig12: Time-dependent plasma-sprayed HA coating. This figure shows how a plasma-sprayed HA coating on a porous titanium (dark bars) dependent on the implantation time will improve the interfacial bond strength compared to uncoated porous titanium (light bars). Reprinted from Hench (1991) with permission.
Mentions: In biomedical applications, bone grafts are usually much thicker than coatings, films or layers applied to them. Nevertheless, the coated implants combine the surface biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium orthophosphates with the core strength of strong substrates (Figure‚ÄČ12). The clinical results for calcium orthophosphate-coated implants reveal that they have much longer life times after implantation than uncoated devices, and therefore, they are particularly beneficial for younger patients (Capello et al. 1997). Their biomedical properties are approaching those of bioactive glass-coated implants (Wheeler et al. 2001; Mistry et al. 2011).Figure 12

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

In surgical disciplines, where bones have to be repaired, augmented or improved, bone substitutes are essential. Therefore, an interest has dramatically increased in application of synthetic bone grafts. As various interactions among cells, surrounding tissues and implanted biomaterials always occur at the interfaces, the surface properties of the implants are of the paramount importance in determining both the biological response to implants and the material response to the physiological conditions. Hence, a surface engineering is aimed to modify both the biomaterials, themselves, and biological responses through introducing desirable changes to the surface properties of the implants but still maintaining their bulk mechanical properties. To fulfill these requirements, a special class of artificial bone grafts has been introduced in 1976. It is composed of various mechanically stable (therefore, suitable for load bearing applications) biomaterials and/or bio-devices with calcium orthophosphate coatings, films and layers on their surfaces to both improve interactions with the surrounding tissues and provide an adequate bonding to bones. Many production techniques of calcium orthophosphate coatings, films and layers have been already invented and new promising techniques are continuously investigated. These specialized coatings, films and layers used to improve the surface properties of various types of artificial implants are the topic of this review.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/2194-0517-1-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.