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Polystyrene surface modification using excimer laser and radio-frequency plasma: blood compatibility evaluations

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ABSTRACT

Biomaterial surface modification is an efficient method to improve and control blood component-material interactions. In the present study, two different methods (ArF excimer laser irradiation and radio-frequency (RF) plasma treatment) were applied in separate procedures to create a vast range of physicochemical characteristics on the surface of polystyrene (PS) and investigate their effects on blood compatibility of treated surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transmission infrared analysis were applied to study the morphology and chemical characteristics of treated samples in comparison with those of the untreated PS. Contact angle and surface tension measurements with two different solvents were used to evaluate the wettability and surface energy of the treated PS films. The effect of the physicochemical properties of the PS surface on blood compatibility was investigated using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) method. AFM studies showed that after laser treatment, some distinctive nanostructures are created on the surface of PS. The data from contact angle measurements demonstrated that ArF excimer laser irradiation and RF plasma treatment created surfaces with a vast range of properties in the wettability point of view. The LDH results revealed that after surface modification by laser irradiation and plasma treatment, blood compatibility of PS films was enhanced. In addition, these results offered that the most blood compatible samples were those which irradiated with 5 pulses of laser and the one treated 4 minutes in oxygen plasma.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/2194-0517-1-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


AFM image and profile of (a) untreated PS and (b) one-pulse-laser-treated PS.
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Fig1: AFM image and profile of (a) untreated PS and (b) one-pulse-laser-treated PS.

Mentions: The physicochemical characteristics of PS surface treated with laser and plasma are reported elsewhere thoroughly (Mirzadeh and Bagheri 2007). Briefly, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM; not reported here) and AFM studies (Figure 1) of laser-irradiated PS revealed that laser irradiation created some nanostructures (with average valley width of 150 nm and average depth of 15 nm) on the PS surface. It has been reported that the laser irradiation of polymers such as polystyrene with high adsorption results in ablation of the surface which subsequently leads to induction of some specific morphological structures on the surface (Srinivasan et al. 1990Knittel et al.1997Dadsetan et al.2001b). In addition, increasing pulse numbers causes augmentation of the valley size (Mirzadeh and Bagheri 2007).Figure 1


Polystyrene surface modification using excimer laser and radio-frequency plasma: blood compatibility evaluations
AFM image and profile of (a) untreated PS and (b) one-pulse-laser-treated PS.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120664&req=5

Fig1: AFM image and profile of (a) untreated PS and (b) one-pulse-laser-treated PS.
Mentions: The physicochemical characteristics of PS surface treated with laser and plasma are reported elsewhere thoroughly (Mirzadeh and Bagheri 2007). Briefly, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM; not reported here) and AFM studies (Figure 1) of laser-irradiated PS revealed that laser irradiation created some nanostructures (with average valley width of 150 nm and average depth of 15 nm) on the PS surface. It has been reported that the laser irradiation of polymers such as polystyrene with high adsorption results in ablation of the surface which subsequently leads to induction of some specific morphological structures on the surface (Srinivasan et al. 1990Knittel et al.1997Dadsetan et al.2001b). In addition, increasing pulse numbers causes augmentation of the valley size (Mirzadeh and Bagheri 2007).Figure 1

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Biomaterial surface modification is an efficient method to improve and control blood component-material interactions. In the present study, two different methods (ArF excimer laser irradiation and radio-frequency (RF) plasma treatment) were applied in separate procedures to create a vast range of physicochemical characteristics on the surface of polystyrene (PS) and investigate their effects on blood compatibility of treated surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transmission infrared analysis were applied to study the morphology and chemical characteristics of treated samples in comparison with those of the untreated PS. Contact angle and surface tension measurements with two different solvents were used to evaluate the wettability and surface energy of the treated PS films. The effect of the physicochemical properties of the PS surface on blood compatibility was investigated using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) method. AFM studies showed that after laser treatment, some distinctive nanostructures are created on the surface of PS. The data from contact angle measurements demonstrated that ArF excimer laser irradiation and RF plasma treatment created surfaces with a vast range of properties in the wettability point of view. The LDH results revealed that after surface modification by laser irradiation and plasma treatment, blood compatibility of PS films was enhanced. In addition, these results offered that the most blood compatible samples were those which irradiated with 5 pulses of laser and the one treated 4 minutes in oxygen plasma.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/2194-0517-1-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.