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Dermoscopy in General Dermatology: A Practical Overview

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Over the last few years, dermoscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in assisting the noninvasive diagnosis of various general dermatological disorders. In this article, we sought to provide an up-to-date practical overview on the use of dermoscopy in general dermatology by analysing the dermoscopic differential diagnosis of relatively common dermatological disorders grouped according to their clinical presentation, i.e. dermatoses presenting with erythematous-desquamative patches/plaques (plaque psoriasis, eczematous dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, mycosis fungoides and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus), papulosquamous/papulokeratotic dermatoses (lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, papulosquamous sarcoidosis, guttate psoriasis, pityriasis lichenoides chronica, classical pityriasis rubra pilaris, porokeratosis, lymphomatoid papulosis, papulosquamous chronic GVHD, parakeratosis variegata, Grover disease, Darier disease and BRAF-inhibitor-induced acantholytic dyskeratosis), facial inflammatory skin diseases (rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, discoid lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, cutaneous leishmaniasis, lupus vulgaris, granuloma faciale and demodicidosis), acquired keratodermas (chronic hand eczema, palmar psoriasis, keratoderma due to mycosis fungoides, keratoderma resulting from pityriasis rubra pilaris, tinea manuum, palmar lichen planus and aquagenic palmar keratoderma), sclero-atrophic dermatoses (necrobiosis lipoidica, morphea and cutaneous lichen sclerosus), hypopigmented macular diseases (extragenital guttate lichen sclerosus, achromic pityriasis versicolor, guttate vitiligo, idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, progressive macular hypomelanosis and postinflammatory hypopigmentations), hyperpigmented maculopapular diseases (pityriasis versicolor, lichen planus pigmentosus, Gougerot-Carteaud syndrome, Dowling-Degos disease, erythema ab igne, macular amyloidosis, lichen amyloidosus, friction melanosis, terra firma-forme dermatosis, urticaria pigmentosa and telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans), itchy papulonodular dermatoses (hypertrophic lichen planus, prurigo nodularis, nodular scabies and acquired perforating dermatosis), erythrodermas (due to psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, mycosis fungoides, pityriasis rubra pilaris and scabies), noninfectious balanitis (Zoon’s plasma cell balanitis, psoriatic balanitis, seborrheic dermatitis and non-specific balanitis) and erythroplasia of Queyrat, inflammatory cicatricial alopecias (scalp discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia and folliculitis decalvans), nonscarring alopecias (alopecia areata, trichotillomania, androgenetic alopecia and telogen effluvium) and scaling disorders of the scalp (tinea capitis, scalp psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis and pityriasis amiantacea).

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Dermoscopy of hyperpigmented lesions of pityriasis versicolor often shows fine whitish scaling localised in the skin furrows associated with a diffuse brownish pigmentation (a). The most common dermoscopic finding of lichen planus pigmentosus is represented by fine/coarse, grey-blue/brown dots over a brownish background (b), while confluent and reticulated papillomatosis (Gougerot–Carteaud syndrome) displays fine whitish scaling and brownish, homogeneous, more or less defined, polygonal, flat globules separated by whitish/pale striae creating a cobblestone pattern (c). Dermoscopic examination of pigmented lesions of erythema ab igne may reveal diffuse brownish pigmentation with telangiectatic vessels/fine whitish scaling, while friction melanosis and urticaria pigmentosa typically display brownish structureless areas arranged in a reticular fashion (e) and a homogeneous light-brown blot with a pigment network (f), respectively
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Fig8: Dermoscopy of hyperpigmented lesions of pityriasis versicolor often shows fine whitish scaling localised in the skin furrows associated with a diffuse brownish pigmentation (a). The most common dermoscopic finding of lichen planus pigmentosus is represented by fine/coarse, grey-blue/brown dots over a brownish background (b), while confluent and reticulated papillomatosis (Gougerot–Carteaud syndrome) displays fine whitish scaling and brownish, homogeneous, more or less defined, polygonal, flat globules separated by whitish/pale striae creating a cobblestone pattern (c). Dermoscopic examination of pigmented lesions of erythema ab igne may reveal diffuse brownish pigmentation with telangiectatic vessels/fine whitish scaling, while friction melanosis and urticaria pigmentosa typically display brownish structureless areas arranged in a reticular fashion (e) and a homogeneous light-brown blot with a pigment network (f), respectively

Mentions: Dermoscopy of hyperpigmented lesions of pityriasis versicolor shows fine whitish scaling (often localised in the skin furrows) associated with a pigmented network composed of brown stripes [107] or a diffuse, more or less homogeneous, brownish pigmentation (Fig. 8a) (personal observations).Fig. 8


Dermoscopy in General Dermatology: A Practical Overview
Dermoscopy of hyperpigmented lesions of pityriasis versicolor often shows fine whitish scaling localised in the skin furrows associated with a diffuse brownish pigmentation (a). The most common dermoscopic finding of lichen planus pigmentosus is represented by fine/coarse, grey-blue/brown dots over a brownish background (b), while confluent and reticulated papillomatosis (Gougerot–Carteaud syndrome) displays fine whitish scaling and brownish, homogeneous, more or less defined, polygonal, flat globules separated by whitish/pale striae creating a cobblestone pattern (c). Dermoscopic examination of pigmented lesions of erythema ab igne may reveal diffuse brownish pigmentation with telangiectatic vessels/fine whitish scaling, while friction melanosis and urticaria pigmentosa typically display brownish structureless areas arranged in a reticular fashion (e) and a homogeneous light-brown blot with a pigment network (f), respectively
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120630&req=5

Fig8: Dermoscopy of hyperpigmented lesions of pityriasis versicolor often shows fine whitish scaling localised in the skin furrows associated with a diffuse brownish pigmentation (a). The most common dermoscopic finding of lichen planus pigmentosus is represented by fine/coarse, grey-blue/brown dots over a brownish background (b), while confluent and reticulated papillomatosis (Gougerot–Carteaud syndrome) displays fine whitish scaling and brownish, homogeneous, more or less defined, polygonal, flat globules separated by whitish/pale striae creating a cobblestone pattern (c). Dermoscopic examination of pigmented lesions of erythema ab igne may reveal diffuse brownish pigmentation with telangiectatic vessels/fine whitish scaling, while friction melanosis and urticaria pigmentosa typically display brownish structureless areas arranged in a reticular fashion (e) and a homogeneous light-brown blot with a pigment network (f), respectively
Mentions: Dermoscopy of hyperpigmented lesions of pityriasis versicolor shows fine whitish scaling (often localised in the skin furrows) associated with a pigmented network composed of brown stripes [107] or a diffuse, more or less homogeneous, brownish pigmentation (Fig. 8a) (personal observations).Fig. 8

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Over the last few years, dermoscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in assisting the noninvasive diagnosis of various general dermatological disorders. In this article, we sought to provide an up-to-date practical overview on the use of dermoscopy in general dermatology by analysing the dermoscopic differential diagnosis of relatively common dermatological disorders grouped according to their clinical presentation, i.e. dermatoses presenting with erythematous-desquamative patches/plaques (plaque psoriasis, eczematous dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, mycosis fungoides and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus), papulosquamous/papulokeratotic dermatoses (lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, papulosquamous sarcoidosis, guttate psoriasis, pityriasis lichenoides chronica, classical pityriasis rubra pilaris, porokeratosis, lymphomatoid papulosis, papulosquamous chronic GVHD, parakeratosis variegata, Grover disease, Darier disease and BRAF-inhibitor-induced acantholytic dyskeratosis), facial inflammatory skin diseases (rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, discoid lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, cutaneous leishmaniasis, lupus vulgaris, granuloma faciale and demodicidosis), acquired keratodermas (chronic hand eczema, palmar psoriasis, keratoderma due to mycosis fungoides, keratoderma resulting from pityriasis rubra pilaris, tinea manuum, palmar lichen planus and aquagenic palmar keratoderma), sclero-atrophic dermatoses (necrobiosis lipoidica, morphea and cutaneous lichen sclerosus), hypopigmented macular diseases (extragenital guttate lichen sclerosus, achromic pityriasis versicolor, guttate vitiligo, idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, progressive macular hypomelanosis and postinflammatory hypopigmentations), hyperpigmented maculopapular diseases (pityriasis versicolor, lichen planus pigmentosus, Gougerot-Carteaud syndrome, Dowling-Degos disease, erythema ab igne, macular amyloidosis, lichen amyloidosus, friction melanosis, terra firma-forme dermatosis, urticaria pigmentosa and telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans), itchy papulonodular dermatoses (hypertrophic lichen planus, prurigo nodularis, nodular scabies and acquired perforating dermatosis), erythrodermas (due to psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, mycosis fungoides, pityriasis rubra pilaris and scabies), noninfectious balanitis (Zoon’s plasma cell balanitis, psoriatic balanitis, seborrheic dermatitis and non-specific balanitis) and erythroplasia of Queyrat, inflammatory cicatricial alopecias (scalp discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia and folliculitis decalvans), nonscarring alopecias (alopecia areata, trichotillomania, androgenetic alopecia and telogen effluvium) and scaling disorders of the scalp (tinea capitis, scalp psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis and pityriasis amiantacea).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus