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Self-control and problematic mobile phone use in Chinese college students: the mediating role of mobile phone use patterns

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ABSTRACT

Background: With the popularity of mobile phones, problematic mobile phone use is getting increasing attention in recent years. Although self-control was found to be a critical predictor of problematic mobile phone use, no study has ever explored the association between self-control and mobile phone use patterns as well as the possible pathway how self-control affects problematic mobile phone use.

Methods: Four hundred sixty-eight college students were randomly selected in this study. Data were collected using the Problematic Mobile Phone Use Scale, the Self-Control Scale, and the Mobile Phone Use Pattern Questionnaire. Statistical tests were conducted to identify the potential role of mobile phone use patterns in the association between self-control and problematic mobile phone use.

Results: In this sample, female students displayed significant higher mobile phone dependence than males. Self-control was negatively correlated with interpersonal, transaction and entertainment mobile phone use patterns, but positively correlated with information seeking use pattern. Self-control could predict problematic mobile phone use directly and indirectly via interpersonal and transaction patterns.

Conclusions: Our research provided additional evidence for the negative association between self-control and problematic mobile phone use. Moreover, interpersonal and transaction use patterns played a mediating role in this link.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12888-016-1131-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


Conceptual model of the mediating effect of mobile phone use patterns. Note: ap < 0.05; cp < 0.001
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Fig1: Conceptual model of the mediating effect of mobile phone use patterns. Note: ap < 0.05; cp < 0.001

Mentions: The hypothesis model of this research assumes use patterns mediate the relationship between self-control and problematic mobile phone use. As shown in Fig. 1, the model fitting values are χ2/df = 2.26, RMSEA = 0.05, GFI = 0.97, CFI = 0.97, NFI = 0.94, TLI = 0.95, IFI = 0.97, indicating the model fit is ideal. Thus, self-control can directly predict college students’ problematic mobile phone use, and indirectly via interpersonal and transaction use patterns. The mediating effect accounted for 12.77% of the total effect.Fig. 1


Self-control and problematic mobile phone use in Chinese college students: the mediating role of mobile phone use patterns
Conceptual model of the mediating effect of mobile phone use patterns. Note: ap < 0.05; cp < 0.001
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120559&req=5

Fig1: Conceptual model of the mediating effect of mobile phone use patterns. Note: ap < 0.05; cp < 0.001
Mentions: The hypothesis model of this research assumes use patterns mediate the relationship between self-control and problematic mobile phone use. As shown in Fig. 1, the model fitting values are χ2/df = 2.26, RMSEA = 0.05, GFI = 0.97, CFI = 0.97, NFI = 0.94, TLI = 0.95, IFI = 0.97, indicating the model fit is ideal. Thus, self-control can directly predict college students’ problematic mobile phone use, and indirectly via interpersonal and transaction use patterns. The mediating effect accounted for 12.77% of the total effect.Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: With the popularity of mobile phones, problematic mobile phone use is getting increasing attention in recent years. Although self-control was found to be a critical predictor of problematic mobile phone use, no study has ever explored the association between self-control and mobile phone use patterns as well as the possible pathway how self-control affects problematic mobile phone use.

Methods: Four hundred sixty-eight college students were randomly selected in this study. Data were collected using the Problematic Mobile Phone Use Scale, the Self-Control Scale, and the Mobile Phone Use Pattern Questionnaire. Statistical tests were conducted to identify the potential role of mobile phone use patterns in the association between self-control and problematic mobile phone use.

Results: In this sample, female students displayed significant higher mobile phone dependence than males. Self-control was negatively correlated with interpersonal, transaction and entertainment mobile phone use patterns, but positively correlated with information seeking use pattern. Self-control could predict problematic mobile phone use directly and indirectly via interpersonal and transaction patterns.

Conclusions: Our research provided additional evidence for the negative association between self-control and problematic mobile phone use. Moreover, interpersonal and transaction use patterns played a mediating role in this link.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12888-016-1131-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.