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Parental perception of built environment characteristics and built environment use among Latino families: a cross-sectional study

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Perception of undesirable features may inhibit built environment use for physical activity among underserved families with children at risk for obesity.

Methods: To examine the association of perceived availability, condition, and safety of the built environment with its self-reported use for physical activity, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis on baseline data from a randomized controlled trial. Adjusted Poisson regression was used to test the association between the primary independent variables (perceived availability, physical condition, and safety) with the primary outcome of self-reported use of built environment structures.

Results: Among 610 parents (90% Latino) of preschool-age children, 158 (26%) reported that there were no available built environment structures for physical activity in the neighborhood. The use of built environment structures was associated with the perceived number of available structures (B = 0.34, 95% CI 0.31, 0.37, p < 0.001) and their perceived condition (B = 0.19, 95% CI 0.12, 0.27, p = 0.001), but not with perceived safety (B = 0.00, 95% CI −0.01, 0.01, p = 0.7).

Conclusions: In this sample of underserved families, perceived availability and condition of built environment structures were associated with use rather than perceived safety. To encourage physical activity among underserved families, communities need to invest in the condition and availability of built environment structures.

Trial registration: Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01316653) on March 11, 2011.

No MeSH data available.


CONSORT Flow Diagram for Study Enrollment
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Fig1: CONSORT Flow Diagram for Study Enrollment

Mentions: Parent-preschool child dyads were recruited from Davidson County, Tennessee. To ensure similar geographic accessibility to built environment structures, participants resided in or self-identified as users (at least once per week) of the built environment in one of two zip code regions contiguous with two collaborating community recreation centers. Dyads were eligible to participate if they received at least one form of government assistance, spoke English or Spanish, the parent was over 18 years old, the child was between the ages of three and five, and both parent and child could participate in physical activity. We enrolled children in the upper end of normal weight and overweight body mass index percentiles (≥50th and <95th assessed by trained research staff), to reach those most at risk, but who were not yet obese. Full eligibility criteria and methods of the trial have been previously published [12]. The current analyses included caregiver-reported data from the baseline sample of 610 parent-child dyads randomized in the main trial, for which 2,126 families were approached, 1,607 met eligibility criteria, 839 gave informed consent, and 610 completed baseline data collection (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Parental perception of built environment characteristics and built environment use among Latino families: a cross-sectional study
CONSORT Flow Diagram for Study Enrollment
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120513&req=5

Fig1: CONSORT Flow Diagram for Study Enrollment
Mentions: Parent-preschool child dyads were recruited from Davidson County, Tennessee. To ensure similar geographic accessibility to built environment structures, participants resided in or self-identified as users (at least once per week) of the built environment in one of two zip code regions contiguous with two collaborating community recreation centers. Dyads were eligible to participate if they received at least one form of government assistance, spoke English or Spanish, the parent was over 18 years old, the child was between the ages of three and five, and both parent and child could participate in physical activity. We enrolled children in the upper end of normal weight and overweight body mass index percentiles (≥50th and <95th assessed by trained research staff), to reach those most at risk, but who were not yet obese. Full eligibility criteria and methods of the trial have been previously published [12]. The current analyses included caregiver-reported data from the baseline sample of 610 parent-child dyads randomized in the main trial, for which 2,126 families were approached, 1,607 met eligibility criteria, 839 gave informed consent, and 610 completed baseline data collection (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Perception of undesirable features may inhibit built environment use for physical activity among underserved families with children at risk for obesity.

Methods: To examine the association of perceived availability, condition, and safety of the built environment with its self-reported use for physical activity, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis on baseline data from a randomized controlled trial. Adjusted Poisson regression was used to test the association between the primary independent variables (perceived availability, physical condition, and safety) with the primary outcome of self-reported use of built environment structures.

Results: Among 610 parents (90% Latino) of preschool-age children, 158 (26%) reported that there were no available built environment structures for physical activity in the neighborhood. The use of built environment structures was associated with the perceived number of available structures (B&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.34, 95% CI 0.31, 0.37, p&thinsp;&lt;&thinsp;0.001) and their perceived condition (B&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.19, 95% CI 0.12, 0.27, p&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.001), but not with perceived safety (B&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.00, 95% CI &minus;0.01, 0.01, p&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.7).

Conclusions: In this sample of underserved families, perceived availability and condition of built environment structures were associated with use rather than perceived safety. To encourage physical activity among underserved families, communities need to invest in the condition and availability of built environment structures.

Trial registration: Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01316653) on March 11, 2011.

No MeSH data available.