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Omalizumab for chronic urticaria in Latin America

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic urticaria (CU) is defined as the spontaneous appearance of wheals, with or without angioedema, persisting for ≥6 weeks. Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria (CSU) is a type of CU which affects 0.5–1 % of the global population, but it represents a high burden to patients. In recent years, omalizumab is available as treatment of disease. Our aim is to extend previous findings, analyzing effects of omalizumab on symptoms in Latin American patients with CSU.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients treated with omalizumab in Cuenca-Ecuador. 150 mg omalizumab was administered every 4 weeks, and its effects were measured by Urticaria Activity Score (UAS) at baseline and each month in follow up. Complete response was defined as a UAS of 0 or 1, and partial response was classified as a UAS of 2 or more. Also, demographic and clinical variables were collected. Descriptive analyses were employed. Response rates were summarized as counts and percentages after 3 and 5 months. Related Samples Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to compare UAS at baseline and after 3 months. P values <0.05 indicated statistical significance.

Results: 26 subjects were enrolled, almost half were female individuals (57.7 %), with mean age 47.8 years (range, 18–81 years). Mean duration of CU after diagnosis was 23.3 months (range, 2–180 months). Mean UAS at baseline was 5.7 points (range, 4–6 points). Nine patients (34.6 %) completed 3 months of treatment (33 % reported a complete response), with a mean difference in UAS of 3.33 (p = 0.01). Four patients completed 5 months of treatment (75.0 % showed a complete response). All patients previously treated with first-generation antihistamines plus corticosteroids showed no responses at neither 3 nor 5 months of treatment.

Conclusion: Omalizumab is an effective treatment for patients with CU. It is necessary to conduct some future investigations where we can establish if 150 mg could be an option in developing countries.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s40413-016-0127-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


Frequencies of complete (green), partial (blue) and non responses (red) to 150 mg of omalizumab
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Fig1: Frequencies of complete (green), partial (blue) and non responses (red) to 150 mg of omalizumab

Mentions: Over time, UAS decreased from a mean 5.7 points to a mean 2.0 points (Table 2). Of the nine patients who completed 3 months of omalizumab treatment, three (33 %) showed a complete response (UAS of 0–1 point) and four (44.4 %) showed a partial response (UAS of 2 points) (Fig. 1). These nine patients had a mean UAS at 3 months of 2.3 (SD 1.7) points (Table 2). Compared with the mean UAS at baseline of 5.7 (SD 0.7) points in the 26 patients, the mean difference between baseline and 3-month UAS (n = 9) was 3.3 points (95 % confidence interval, 2.0–4.7 points, p = 0.01). Of the four patients who completed 5 months of treatment, three (75.0 %) showed a complete response (Table 3), with a mean difference between baseline and 5-month UAS of 4.0 (95 % CI 0.8–7.2). No serious adverse events were reported.Fig. 1


Omalizumab for chronic urticaria in Latin America
Frequencies of complete (green), partial (blue) and non responses (red) to 150 mg of omalizumab
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120491&req=5

Fig1: Frequencies of complete (green), partial (blue) and non responses (red) to 150 mg of omalizumab
Mentions: Over time, UAS decreased from a mean 5.7 points to a mean 2.0 points (Table 2). Of the nine patients who completed 3 months of omalizumab treatment, three (33 %) showed a complete response (UAS of 0–1 point) and four (44.4 %) showed a partial response (UAS of 2 points) (Fig. 1). These nine patients had a mean UAS at 3 months of 2.3 (SD 1.7) points (Table 2). Compared with the mean UAS at baseline of 5.7 (SD 0.7) points in the 26 patients, the mean difference between baseline and 3-month UAS (n = 9) was 3.3 points (95 % confidence interval, 2.0–4.7 points, p = 0.01). Of the four patients who completed 5 months of treatment, three (75.0 %) showed a complete response (Table 3), with a mean difference between baseline and 5-month UAS of 4.0 (95 % CI 0.8–7.2). No serious adverse events were reported.Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic urticaria (CU) is defined as the spontaneous appearance of wheals, with or without angioedema, persisting for ≥6 weeks. Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria (CSU) is a type of CU which affects 0.5–1 % of the global population, but it represents a high burden to patients. In recent years, omalizumab is available as treatment of disease. Our aim is to extend previous findings, analyzing effects of omalizumab on symptoms in Latin American patients with CSU.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients treated with omalizumab in Cuenca-Ecuador. 150 mg omalizumab was administered every 4 weeks, and its effects were measured by Urticaria Activity Score (UAS) at baseline and each month in follow up. Complete response was defined as a UAS of 0 or 1, and partial response was classified as a UAS of 2 or more. Also, demographic and clinical variables were collected. Descriptive analyses were employed. Response rates were summarized as counts and percentages after 3 and 5 months. Related Samples Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to compare UAS at baseline and after 3 months. P values <0.05 indicated statistical significance.

Results: 26 subjects were enrolled, almost half were female individuals (57.7 %), with mean age 47.8 years (range, 18–81 years). Mean duration of CU after diagnosis was 23.3 months (range, 2–180 months). Mean UAS at baseline was 5.7 points (range, 4–6 points). Nine patients (34.6 %) completed 3 months of treatment (33 % reported a complete response), with a mean difference in UAS of 3.33 (p = 0.01). Four patients completed 5 months of treatment (75.0 % showed a complete response). All patients previously treated with first-generation antihistamines plus corticosteroids showed no responses at neither 3 nor 5 months of treatment.

Conclusion: Omalizumab is an effective treatment for patients with CU. It is necessary to conduct some future investigations where we can establish if 150 mg could be an option in developing countries.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s40413-016-0127-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.