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Medical education in a foreign language and history-taking in the native language in Lebanon – a nationwide survey

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ABSTRACT

Background: With the adoption of the English language in medical education, a gap in clinical communication may develop in countries where the native language is different from the language of medical education. This study investigates the association between medical education in a foreign language and students’ confidence in their history-taking skills in their native language.

Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of a 17-question survey among medical students in clinical clerkships of Lebanese medical schools. The relationship between the language of medical education and confidence in conducting a medical history in Arabic (the native language) was evaluated (n = 457).

Results: The majority (88.5%) of students whose native language was Arabic were confident they could conduct a medical history in Arabic. Among participants enrolled in the first clinical year, high confidence in Arabic history-taking was independently associated with Arabic being the native language and with conducting medical history in Arabic either in the pre-clinical years or during extracurricular activities. Among students in their second clinical year, however, these factors were not associated with confidence levels.

Conclusions: Despite having their medical education in a foreign language, the majority of students in Lebanese medical schools are confident in conducting a medical history in their native language.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Association between curricular exposure to Arabic history-taking during pre-clinical years and involvement in extracurricular activities that require Arabic history-taking
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Fig1: Association between curricular exposure to Arabic history-taking during pre-clinical years and involvement in extracurricular activities that require Arabic history-taking

Mentions: Subsequent analysis demonstrated that when stratified by clinical year, pre-clinical curricular exposure to Arabic history-taking was associated with a higher likelihood of a student being engaged in extracurricular activities involving Arabic history-taking (e.g. volunteer services) (first clinical year: 32.1% vs. 21.0%; second clinical year: 31.2% vs. 18.8%, p = 0.005) (Fig. 1). Although the vast majority of participants (82.9%) believe their future patients will speak Arabic, only 64.5% of those perceived that adding courses for communication in Arabic will be beneficial (first clinical year: 66.4% vs. second clinical year 61.1%, p = 0.31), and only 29.1% of them perceived that having an Objective Structural Clinical Examination (OSCE) in a foreign language may have negatively affected their communication in Arabic during the clinical years (first clinical year: 28.7% vs. second clinical year 29.7%, p = 0.86).Fig. 1


Medical education in a foreign language and history-taking in the native language in Lebanon – a nationwide survey
Association between curricular exposure to Arabic history-taking during pre-clinical years and involvement in extracurricular activities that require Arabic history-taking
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120416&req=5

Fig1: Association between curricular exposure to Arabic history-taking during pre-clinical years and involvement in extracurricular activities that require Arabic history-taking
Mentions: Subsequent analysis demonstrated that when stratified by clinical year, pre-clinical curricular exposure to Arabic history-taking was associated with a higher likelihood of a student being engaged in extracurricular activities involving Arabic history-taking (e.g. volunteer services) (first clinical year: 32.1% vs. 21.0%; second clinical year: 31.2% vs. 18.8%, p = 0.005) (Fig. 1). Although the vast majority of participants (82.9%) believe their future patients will speak Arabic, only 64.5% of those perceived that adding courses for communication in Arabic will be beneficial (first clinical year: 66.4% vs. second clinical year 61.1%, p = 0.31), and only 29.1% of them perceived that having an Objective Structural Clinical Examination (OSCE) in a foreign language may have negatively affected their communication in Arabic during the clinical years (first clinical year: 28.7% vs. second clinical year 29.7%, p = 0.86).Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: With the adoption of the English language in medical education, a gap in clinical communication may develop in countries where the native language is different from the language of medical education. This study investigates the association between medical education in a foreign language and students’ confidence in their history-taking skills in their native language.

Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of a 17-question survey among medical students in clinical clerkships of Lebanese medical schools. The relationship between the language of medical education and confidence in conducting a medical history in Arabic (the native language) was evaluated (n = 457).

Results: The majority (88.5%) of students whose native language was Arabic were confident they could conduct a medical history in Arabic. Among participants enrolled in the first clinical year, high confidence in Arabic history-taking was independently associated with Arabic being the native language and with conducting medical history in Arabic either in the pre-clinical years or during extracurricular activities. Among students in their second clinical year, however, these factors were not associated with confidence levels.

Conclusions: Despite having their medical education in a foreign language, the majority of students in Lebanese medical schools are confident in conducting a medical history in their native language.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus