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Optimizing literature search in systematic reviews – are MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL enough for identifying effect studies within the area of musculoskeletal disorders?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: When conducting systematic reviews, it is essential to perform a comprehensive literature search to identify all published studies relevant to the specific research question. The Cochrane Collaborations Methodological Expectations of Cochrane Intervention Reviews (MECIR) guidelines state that searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL should be considered mandatory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MECIR recommendations to use MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL combined, and examine the yield of using these to find randomized controlled trials (RCTs) within the area of musculoskeletal disorders.

Methods: Data sources were systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group, including at least five RCTs, reporting a search history, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and adding reference- and hand-searching. Additional databases were deemed eligible if they indexed RCTs, were in English and used in more than three of the systematic reviews. Relative recall was calculated as the number of studies identified by the literature search divided by the number of eligible studies i.e. included studies in the individual systematic reviews. Finally, cumulative median recall was calculated for MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL combined followed by the databases yielding additional studies.

Results: Deemed eligible was twenty-three systematic reviews and the databases included other than MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was AMED, CINAHL, HealthSTAR, MANTIS, OT-Seeker, PEDro, PsychINFO, SCOPUS, SportDISCUS and Web of Science. Cumulative median recall for combined searching in MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was 88.9% and increased to 90.9% when adding 10 additional databases.

Conclusion: Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was not sufficient for identifying all effect studies on musculoskeletal disorders, but additional ten databases did only increase the median recall by 2%. It is possible that searching databases is not sufficient to identify all relevant references, and that reviewers must rely upon additional sources in their literature search. However further research is needed.

No MeSH data available.


Flowchart for inclusion of Cochrane reviews and databases
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Fig2: Flowchart for inclusion of Cochrane reviews and databases

Mentions: A timeline is displayed in Fig. 1. A set of 164 SRs where identified and obtained from the CMSG on March 3, 2013 and revisited for an update on July 3 2013 by the first author (Fig. 2). Of the 164 SRs assessed for eligibility by title and abstract, 10 were excluded. Nine for being withdrawn and one for being an overview of reviews. Of the remaining 154 SRs assessed in full-text, 114 were excluded, as they did not search one or more of the following sources: MEDLINE-, CENTRAL-, EMBASE, or reference- and hand searching. 11 SRs were excluded, as they did not include five or more studies in their analysis. Six were excluded for not reporting any search strategy in the SR, neither reporting where one could be acquired. A final set of 23 SRs finally met all inclusion criteria [34–56], (Table 1).Fig. 1


Optimizing literature search in systematic reviews – are MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL enough for identifying effect studies within the area of musculoskeletal disorders?
Flowchart for inclusion of Cochrane reviews and databases
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120411&req=5

Fig2: Flowchart for inclusion of Cochrane reviews and databases
Mentions: A timeline is displayed in Fig. 1. A set of 164 SRs where identified and obtained from the CMSG on March 3, 2013 and revisited for an update on July 3 2013 by the first author (Fig. 2). Of the 164 SRs assessed for eligibility by title and abstract, 10 were excluded. Nine for being withdrawn and one for being an overview of reviews. Of the remaining 154 SRs assessed in full-text, 114 were excluded, as they did not search one or more of the following sources: MEDLINE-, CENTRAL-, EMBASE, or reference- and hand searching. 11 SRs were excluded, as they did not include five or more studies in their analysis. Six were excluded for not reporting any search strategy in the SR, neither reporting where one could be acquired. A final set of 23 SRs finally met all inclusion criteria [34–56], (Table 1).Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: When conducting systematic reviews, it is essential to perform a comprehensive literature search to identify all published studies relevant to the specific research question. The Cochrane Collaborations Methodological Expectations of Cochrane Intervention Reviews (MECIR) guidelines state that searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL should be considered mandatory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MECIR recommendations to use MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL combined, and examine the yield of using these to find randomized controlled trials (RCTs) within the area of musculoskeletal disorders.

Methods: Data sources were systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group, including at least five RCTs, reporting a search history, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and adding reference- and hand-searching. Additional databases were deemed eligible if they indexed RCTs, were in English and used in more than three of the systematic reviews. Relative recall was calculated as the number of studies identified by the literature search divided by the number of eligible studies i.e. included studies in the individual systematic reviews. Finally, cumulative median recall was calculated for MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL combined followed by the databases yielding additional studies.

Results: Deemed eligible was twenty-three systematic reviews and the databases included other than MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was AMED, CINAHL, HealthSTAR, MANTIS, OT-Seeker, PEDro, PsychINFO, SCOPUS, SportDISCUS and Web of Science. Cumulative median recall for combined searching in MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was 88.9% and increased to 90.9% when adding 10 additional databases.

Conclusion: Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was not sufficient for identifying all effect studies on musculoskeletal disorders, but additional ten databases did only increase the median recall by 2%. It is possible that searching databases is not sufficient to identify all relevant references, and that reviewers must rely upon additional sources in their literature search. However further research is needed.

No MeSH data available.