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Does Weather Matter? The Effect of Weather Patterns and Temporal Factors on Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma Volume

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objectives:: Orthopaedists often speculate how weather and school schedule may influence pediatric orthopedic trauma volume, but few studies have examined this. This study aims to determine: how do weather patterns, day, month, season and public school schedule influence the daily frequency of pediatric orthopedic trauma consults and admissions?

Methods:: With IRB approval, orthopedic trauma data from a level 1 pediatric trauma center, including number of daily orthopedic trauma consults and admissions, were collected from July 2009 to March 2012. Historical weather data (high temperatures, precipitation and hours of daylight), along with local public school schedule data were collected for the same time period. Univariate and multivariate regression models were used to show the average number of orthopedic trauma consults and admissions as a function of weather and temporal variables.

Results:: High temperature, precipitation, month and day of the week significantly affected the number of daily consults and admissions. The number of consults and admissions increased by 1% for each degree increase in temperature (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively), and decreased by 21% for each inch of precipitation (p<0.001, p=0.006). Daily consults on snowy days decreased by an additional 16% compared to days with no precipitation. November had the lowest daily consult and admission rate, while September had the highest. Daily consult rate was lowest on Wednesdays and highest on Saturdays. Holiday schedule was not independently significant.

Conclusion:: Pediatric orthopedic trauma consultations and admissions are highly linked to temperature and precipitation, as well as day of the week and time of year.

No MeSH data available.


Average daily consults and admissions by day of the week.
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Figure 1: Average daily consults and admissions by day of the week.

Mentions: During the 957 days (2.62 years) in the study period, there were 5,772 orthopedic trauma consults and 1,572 orthopedic trauma admissions. On average, there were 6 consults per day, ranging from 0 to 22, and 1.6 admissions per day, ranging from 0 to 8. Daily consults and admissions are summarized by weather and temporal factors in Table 1. The number of consults varied by day of the week, but the number of admissions was more consistent (Fig. 1). Wednesdays presented the fewest daily consults and admissions while Saturdays had the highest. The highest rates of daily consults and admissions were in September, followed by May and June. The number of consults and admissions follow the pattern of daily high temperature, except for in the mid-summer months. Both consults and admissions experienced a drop during June, July, and August (Fig. 2). The lowest rates of daily consults and admissions were in November, followed by December. Overall, the greatest number of consults and admissions were observed in the summer season, with the fewest in winter. Also, more consults were seen on non-school days compared to days when school was in session.


Does Weather Matter? The Effect of Weather Patterns and Temporal Factors on Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma Volume
Average daily consults and admissions by day of the week.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120380&req=5

Figure 1: Average daily consults and admissions by day of the week.
Mentions: During the 957 days (2.62 years) in the study period, there were 5,772 orthopedic trauma consults and 1,572 orthopedic trauma admissions. On average, there were 6 consults per day, ranging from 0 to 22, and 1.6 admissions per day, ranging from 0 to 8. Daily consults and admissions are summarized by weather and temporal factors in Table 1. The number of consults varied by day of the week, but the number of admissions was more consistent (Fig. 1). Wednesdays presented the fewest daily consults and admissions while Saturdays had the highest. The highest rates of daily consults and admissions were in September, followed by May and June. The number of consults and admissions follow the pattern of daily high temperature, except for in the mid-summer months. Both consults and admissions experienced a drop during June, July, and August (Fig. 2). The lowest rates of daily consults and admissions were in November, followed by December. Overall, the greatest number of consults and admissions were observed in the summer season, with the fewest in winter. Also, more consults were seen on non-school days compared to days when school was in session.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objectives:: Orthopaedists often speculate how weather and school schedule may influence pediatric orthopedic trauma volume, but few studies have examined this. This study aims to determine: how do weather patterns, day, month, season and public school schedule influence the daily frequency of pediatric orthopedic trauma consults and admissions?

Methods:: With IRB approval, orthopedic trauma data from a level 1 pediatric trauma center, including number of daily orthopedic trauma consults and admissions, were collected from July 2009 to March 2012. Historical weather data (high temperatures, precipitation and hours of daylight), along with local public school schedule data were collected for the same time period. Univariate and multivariate regression models were used to show the average number of orthopedic trauma consults and admissions as a function of weather and temporal variables.

Results:: High temperature, precipitation, month and day of the week significantly affected the number of daily consults and admissions. The number of consults and admissions increased by 1% for each degree increase in temperature (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively), and decreased by 21% for each inch of precipitation (p<0.001, p=0.006). Daily consults on snowy days decreased by an additional 16% compared to days with no precipitation. November had the lowest daily consult and admission rate, while September had the highest. Daily consult rate was lowest on Wednesdays and highest on Saturdays. Holiday schedule was not independently significant.

Conclusion:: Pediatric orthopedic trauma consultations and admissions are highly linked to temperature and precipitation, as well as day of the week and time of year.

No MeSH data available.