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DNA barcoding of Mobulid Ray Gill Rakers for Implementing CITES on Elasmobranch in China

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) has been counted on for conserving threatened marine fish since it regulates the commercial international trade of these species. Implementation of the international treaty for Mantas included on CITES Appendix II is challenging due to insufficient information on species identification and markets management. To fill the gap in such aspects, we identified five species of Mobulid rays (Mobula spps. and Manta spp) by using COI and NADH2 mtDNA markers in dried ray gill rakers from Chinese markets, namely, Mobula japonica (representing 54.8% of the sample set), M. tarapacana (14.4%), M. kuhlii (13.3%), M. thurstoni (6.4%), along with Manta birostris (11.2%; CITES Appendix II). The utilization and conservation statuses of these species were discussed. Based on combination of DNA barcodes and key morphological characters, we developed a three-step process for identifying the gill rakers of Mobulid rays which has been adopted by frontline enforcement in China. We hope that our work can serve as a foundation and basis to reinforce objectives of international treaties, regulation of consumer-driven markets, regional cooperation, and national fishery management on endangered elasmobranchs in China as well as related countries.

No MeSH data available.


A three-step process for identifying the gill rakers of manta rays.
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f3: A three-step process for identifying the gill rakers of manta rays.

Mentions: For frontline enforcement at customs or border inspection, we develop a three-step process for identifying the gill rakers of Manta rays. The process involves weeding out specimens at the first step, inspecting whether or not terminal lobes are enlarged and fused. The variegated gills are then abandoned, and the finger-like projections are finally observed at the edge of middle lobes through a loupe (Fig. 3).


DNA barcoding of Mobulid Ray Gill Rakers for Implementing CITES on Elasmobranch in China
A three-step process for identifying the gill rakers of manta rays.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120345&req=5

f3: A three-step process for identifying the gill rakers of manta rays.
Mentions: For frontline enforcement at customs or border inspection, we develop a three-step process for identifying the gill rakers of Manta rays. The process involves weeding out specimens at the first step, inspecting whether or not terminal lobes are enlarged and fused. The variegated gills are then abandoned, and the finger-like projections are finally observed at the edge of middle lobes through a loupe (Fig. 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) has been counted on for conserving threatened marine fish since it regulates the commercial international trade of these species. Implementation of the international treaty for Mantas included on CITES Appendix II is challenging due to insufficient information on species identification and markets management. To fill the gap in such aspects, we identified five species of Mobulid rays (Mobula spps. and Manta spp) by using COI and NADH2 mtDNA markers in dried ray gill rakers from Chinese markets, namely, Mobula japonica (representing 54.8% of the sample set), M. tarapacana (14.4%), M. kuhlii (13.3%), M. thurstoni (6.4%), along with Manta birostris (11.2%; CITES Appendix II). The utilization and conservation statuses of these species were discussed. Based on combination of DNA barcodes and key morphological characters, we developed a three-step process for identifying the gill rakers of Mobulid rays which has been adopted by frontline enforcement in China. We hope that our work can serve as a foundation and basis to reinforce objectives of international treaties, regulation of consumer-driven markets, regional cooperation, and national fishery management on endangered elasmobranchs in China as well as related countries.

No MeSH data available.