Limits...
Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor with metastasis to the penis: Case report and review of literature

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The first reported case of a rectal GIST with metastasis to the penis is documented by this report.

The primary cancer was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and abdominoperineal resection.

Biopsies of lesions identified on follow-up imaging were consistent with metastatic GIST.

Metastasectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy have been utilized to help prolong survival.

Metastasectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy have been utilized to help prolong survival.

No MeSH data available.


Axial view of follow-up MRI. MRI of the pelvis obtained four months after resuming imatinib demonstrated decrease in the size of the right corpus cavernosum mass from 8.4 × 4.3 × 3.6 cm to 4.9 × 1.8 × 1.5 cm.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120263&req=5

fig0025: Axial view of follow-up MRI. MRI of the pelvis obtained four months after resuming imatinib demonstrated decrease in the size of the right corpus cavernosum mass from 8.4 × 4.3 × 3.6 cm to 4.9 × 1.8 × 1.5 cm.

Mentions: Medical and surgical options were discussed with the patient, who opted to continue imatinib therapy, as opposed to undergoing surgery. Three months after resuming imatinib, the patient reported decreased perineal pain and ability to obtain an erection with the use of a vacuum device. Four months after resuming imatinib, an MRI of the pelvis demonstrated that the metastatic penile lesion had decreased in size (Fig. 5). The patient was then receptive to undergo surgical resection of the right corpus cavernosum. Pathological examination of the excised tumor revealed metastatic GIST with lymphovascular invasion identified, 94 mitoses/50hpf, and positive margins. Imatinib was continued post-operatively.


Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor with metastasis to the penis: Case report and review of literature
Axial view of follow-up MRI. MRI of the pelvis obtained four months after resuming imatinib demonstrated decrease in the size of the right corpus cavernosum mass from 8.4 × 4.3 × 3.6 cm to 4.9 × 1.8 × 1.5 cm.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120263&req=5

fig0025: Axial view of follow-up MRI. MRI of the pelvis obtained four months after resuming imatinib demonstrated decrease in the size of the right corpus cavernosum mass from 8.4 × 4.3 × 3.6 cm to 4.9 × 1.8 × 1.5 cm.
Mentions: Medical and surgical options were discussed with the patient, who opted to continue imatinib therapy, as opposed to undergoing surgery. Three months after resuming imatinib, the patient reported decreased perineal pain and ability to obtain an erection with the use of a vacuum device. Four months after resuming imatinib, an MRI of the pelvis demonstrated that the metastatic penile lesion had decreased in size (Fig. 5). The patient was then receptive to undergo surgical resection of the right corpus cavernosum. Pathological examination of the excised tumor revealed metastatic GIST with lymphovascular invasion identified, 94 mitoses/50hpf, and positive margins. Imatinib was continued post-operatively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The first reported case of a rectal GIST with metastasis to the penis is documented by this report.

The primary cancer was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and abdominoperineal resection.

Biopsies of lesions identified on follow-up imaging were consistent with metastatic GIST.

Metastasectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy have been utilized to help prolong survival.

Metastasectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy have been utilized to help prolong survival.

No MeSH data available.