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Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor with metastasis to the penis: Case report and review of literature

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The first reported case of a rectal GIST with metastasis to the penis is documented by this report.

The primary cancer was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and abdominoperineal resection.

Biopsies of lesions identified on follow-up imaging were consistent with metastatic GIST.

Metastasectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy have been utilized to help prolong survival.

Metastasectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy have been utilized to help prolong survival.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Microscopic analysis of the rectal GIST. Tumor cells are spindled, forming fascicles with increased mitotic rate.
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fig0005: Microscopic analysis of the rectal GIST. Tumor cells are spindled, forming fascicles with increased mitotic rate.

Mentions: A 51-year-old Caucasian male was found to have a 6.5 × 6 cm rectal mass just proximal to the sphincter complex on screening colonoscopy. Biopsy of the mass demonstrated GIST with mitotic figures. The patient was started on neoadjuvant imatinib therapy to downstage the tumor prior to surgical resection. Four months after initiating treatment, an MRI of the pelvis revealed excellent response to imatinib, as the rectal mass had reduced in size to 3.8 × 3.1 × 2.2 cm. After a total of eight months of neoadjuvant imatinib therapy, the patient underwent an abdominoperineal resection (APR). The patient did well peri-operatively. Pathology of the surgical specimen revealed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor 2.8 cm in greatest extent, 80–90% hyalinization with scarce cellularity (Fig. 1, Fig. 2). The lesion involved the mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria, and perirectal soft tissue. Mitotic rate of <1/50hpf was visualized. Perineural invasion was identified, but lymphovascular invasion was not. Negative margins were attained, and eleven of eleven lymph nodes collected were negative for malignancy. Imatinib therapy was continued postoperatively.


Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor with metastasis to the penis: Case report and review of literature
Microscopic analysis of the rectal GIST. Tumor cells are spindled, forming fascicles with increased mitotic rate.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120263&req=5

fig0005: Microscopic analysis of the rectal GIST. Tumor cells are spindled, forming fascicles with increased mitotic rate.
Mentions: A 51-year-old Caucasian male was found to have a 6.5 × 6 cm rectal mass just proximal to the sphincter complex on screening colonoscopy. Biopsy of the mass demonstrated GIST with mitotic figures. The patient was started on neoadjuvant imatinib therapy to downstage the tumor prior to surgical resection. Four months after initiating treatment, an MRI of the pelvis revealed excellent response to imatinib, as the rectal mass had reduced in size to 3.8 × 3.1 × 2.2 cm. After a total of eight months of neoadjuvant imatinib therapy, the patient underwent an abdominoperineal resection (APR). The patient did well peri-operatively. Pathology of the surgical specimen revealed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor 2.8 cm in greatest extent, 80–90% hyalinization with scarce cellularity (Fig. 1, Fig. 2). The lesion involved the mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria, and perirectal soft tissue. Mitotic rate of <1/50hpf was visualized. Perineural invasion was identified, but lymphovascular invasion was not. Negative margins were attained, and eleven of eleven lymph nodes collected were negative for malignancy. Imatinib therapy was continued postoperatively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The first reported case of a rectal GIST with metastasis to the penis is documented by this report.

The primary cancer was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and abdominoperineal resection.

Biopsies of lesions identified on follow-up imaging were consistent with metastatic GIST.

Metastasectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy have been utilized to help prolong survival.

Metastasectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy have been utilized to help prolong survival.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus