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Sonoelastography in the musculoskeletal system: Current role and future directions

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ultrasound is an essential modality within musculoskeletal imaging, with the recent addition of elastography. The elastic properties of tissues are different from the acoustic impedance used to create B mode imaging and the flow properties used within Doppler imaging, hence elastography provides a different form of tissue assessment. The current role of ultrasound elastography in the musculoskeletal system will be reviewed, in particular with reference to muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints and soft tissue tumours. The different ultrasound elastography methods currently available will be described, in particular strain elastography and shear wave elastography. Future directions of ultrasound elastography in the musculoskeletal system will also be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intramuscular nodular fasciitis, longitudinal images. The B mode image (upper image) shows that the margins of the lesion are poorly defined and relatively hard to discern. The shear wave velocity elastograms (lower images) show a clear difference in stiffness between the lesion and adjacent normal muscle fibres, as shown by the blue (slow) colour map of the lesion compared with the green and red (faster) colour map of the adjacent muscle fibres.
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Figure 8: Intramuscular nodular fasciitis, longitudinal images. The B mode image (upper image) shows that the margins of the lesion are poorly defined and relatively hard to discern. The shear wave velocity elastograms (lower images) show a clear difference in stiffness between the lesion and adjacent normal muscle fibres, as shown by the blue (slow) colour map of the lesion compared with the green and red (faster) colour map of the adjacent muscle fibres.

Mentions: Another potential use of elastography in tumours may be to define the boundaries of a lesion, compared with normal tissue. In regions with poor B-mode contrast it can be hard to identify the margin of a lesion, however, the elastogram may show a sharp demarcation if the lesion has different elastic properties compared with the adjacent normal tissue (Figure 8). This is of value within breast[52] and prostate lesions and may prove to be the most useful application of elastography in soft tissue tumours.


Sonoelastography in the musculoskeletal system: Current role and future directions
Intramuscular nodular fasciitis, longitudinal images. The B mode image (upper image) shows that the margins of the lesion are poorly defined and relatively hard to discern. The shear wave velocity elastograms (lower images) show a clear difference in stiffness between the lesion and adjacent normal muscle fibres, as shown by the blue (slow) colour map of the lesion compared with the green and red (faster) colour map of the adjacent muscle fibres.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120246&req=5

Figure 8: Intramuscular nodular fasciitis, longitudinal images. The B mode image (upper image) shows that the margins of the lesion are poorly defined and relatively hard to discern. The shear wave velocity elastograms (lower images) show a clear difference in stiffness between the lesion and adjacent normal muscle fibres, as shown by the blue (slow) colour map of the lesion compared with the green and red (faster) colour map of the adjacent muscle fibres.
Mentions: Another potential use of elastography in tumours may be to define the boundaries of a lesion, compared with normal tissue. In regions with poor B-mode contrast it can be hard to identify the margin of a lesion, however, the elastogram may show a sharp demarcation if the lesion has different elastic properties compared with the adjacent normal tissue (Figure 8). This is of value within breast[52] and prostate lesions and may prove to be the most useful application of elastography in soft tissue tumours.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ultrasound is an essential modality within musculoskeletal imaging, with the recent addition of elastography. The elastic properties of tissues are different from the acoustic impedance used to create B mode imaging and the flow properties used within Doppler imaging, hence elastography provides a different form of tissue assessment. The current role of ultrasound elastography in the musculoskeletal system will be reviewed, in particular with reference to muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints and soft tissue tumours. The different ultrasound elastography methods currently available will be described, in particular strain elastography and shear wave elastography. Future directions of ultrasound elastography in the musculoskeletal system will also be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus