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Sonoelastography in the musculoskeletal system: Current role and future directions

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ultrasound is an essential modality within musculoskeletal imaging, with the recent addition of elastography. The elastic properties of tissues are different from the acoustic impedance used to create B mode imaging and the flow properties used within Doppler imaging, hence elastography provides a different form of tissue assessment. The current role of ultrasound elastography in the musculoskeletal system will be reviewed, in particular with reference to muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints and soft tissue tumours. The different ultrasound elastography methods currently available will be described, in particular strain elastography and shear wave elastography. Future directions of ultrasound elastography in the musculoskeletal system will also be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Longitudinal shear wave elastography of the Achilles tendon. In a healthy volunteer the Achilles tendon is seen as smooth and homogeneous (arrow) on the B mode image (A) with a homogeneous elastogram (B, arrow). In a patient with symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy there is an alteration of the B mode echotexture with regions of hypoechogenicity (C, curved arrow) and dystrophic ossification at the calcaneal enthesis. The elastogram (D) is heterogeneous with regions of blue and yellow colouring (curved arrow) corresponding to a slower velocity and tendon softening.
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Figure 2: Longitudinal shear wave elastography of the Achilles tendon. In a healthy volunteer the Achilles tendon is seen as smooth and homogeneous (arrow) on the B mode image (A) with a homogeneous elastogram (B, arrow). In a patient with symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy there is an alteration of the B mode echotexture with regions of hypoechogenicity (C, curved arrow) and dystrophic ossification at the calcaneal enthesis. The elastogram (D) is heterogeneous with regions of blue and yellow colouring (curved arrow) corresponding to a slower velocity and tendon softening.

Mentions: Shear wave elastography has also been used to study the Achilles tendon. Slower shear wave velocities have been demonstrated in tendinopathic tendons compared with healthy controls[33], also suggesting a softer tendon substance in pathology (Figure 2). As described previously, shear wave elastography measurements are not necessarily comparable between different manufacturers’ equipment, thus potentially limiting the reproducibility. This is evidenced by the large range of quoted normal shear wave values for the Achilles tendon within healthy subjects[34].


Sonoelastography in the musculoskeletal system: Current role and future directions
Longitudinal shear wave elastography of the Achilles tendon. In a healthy volunteer the Achilles tendon is seen as smooth and homogeneous (arrow) on the B mode image (A) with a homogeneous elastogram (B, arrow). In a patient with symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy there is an alteration of the B mode echotexture with regions of hypoechogenicity (C, curved arrow) and dystrophic ossification at the calcaneal enthesis. The elastogram (D) is heterogeneous with regions of blue and yellow colouring (curved arrow) corresponding to a slower velocity and tendon softening.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120246&req=5

Figure 2: Longitudinal shear wave elastography of the Achilles tendon. In a healthy volunteer the Achilles tendon is seen as smooth and homogeneous (arrow) on the B mode image (A) with a homogeneous elastogram (B, arrow). In a patient with symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy there is an alteration of the B mode echotexture with regions of hypoechogenicity (C, curved arrow) and dystrophic ossification at the calcaneal enthesis. The elastogram (D) is heterogeneous with regions of blue and yellow colouring (curved arrow) corresponding to a slower velocity and tendon softening.
Mentions: Shear wave elastography has also been used to study the Achilles tendon. Slower shear wave velocities have been demonstrated in tendinopathic tendons compared with healthy controls[33], also suggesting a softer tendon substance in pathology (Figure 2). As described previously, shear wave elastography measurements are not necessarily comparable between different manufacturers’ equipment, thus potentially limiting the reproducibility. This is evidenced by the large range of quoted normal shear wave values for the Achilles tendon within healthy subjects[34].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Ultrasound is an essential modality within musculoskeletal imaging, with the recent addition of elastography. The elastic properties of tissues are different from the acoustic impedance used to create B mode imaging and the flow properties used within Doppler imaging, hence elastography provides a different form of tissue assessment. The current role of ultrasound elastography in the musculoskeletal system will be reviewed, in particular with reference to muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints and soft tissue tumours. The different ultrasound elastography methods currently available will be described, in particular strain elastography and shear wave elastography. Future directions of ultrasound elastography in the musculoskeletal system will also be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus