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Renal progenitors: Roles in kidney disease and regeneration

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Kidney disease is a devastating condition that affects millions of people worldwide, and its prevalence is predicted to significantly increase. The kidney is a complex organ encompassing many diverse cell types organized in a elaborate tissue architecture, making regeneration a challenging feat. In recent years, there has been a surge in the field of stem cell research to develop regenerative therapies for various organ systems. Here, we review some recent progressions in characterizing the role of renal progenitors in development, regeneration, and kidney disease in mammals. We also discuss how the zebrafish provides a unique experimental animal model that can provide a greater molecular and genetic understanding of renal progenitors, which may contribute to the development of potential regenerative therapies for human renal afflictions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Neonephrogenesis in the adult zebrafish. Adult zebrafish possess the unique ability to generate new nephrons during adulthood. Neonephrogenesis in zebrafish mimics the cellular dynamics of nephrogenesis during mammalian kidney development. Renal progenitors cluster to create a PTA. This aggregate changes morphology as it first forms a comma-shape followed by an S-shape. The SSB differentiates into specific cell types that comprise the blood filter and tubules of a mature nephron. CD: Collecting duct; G: Glomerulus; PTA: Pre-tubular aggregate; CSB: Comma-shaped body; SSB: S-shaped body.
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Figure 5: Neonephrogenesis in the adult zebrafish. Adult zebrafish possess the unique ability to generate new nephrons during adulthood. Neonephrogenesis in zebrafish mimics the cellular dynamics of nephrogenesis during mammalian kidney development. Renal progenitors cluster to create a PTA. This aggregate changes morphology as it first forms a comma-shape followed by an S-shape. The SSB differentiates into specific cell types that comprise the blood filter and tubules of a mature nephron. CD: Collecting duct; G: Glomerulus; PTA: Pre-tubular aggregate; CSB: Comma-shaped body; SSB: S-shaped body.

Mentions: Renal progenitors exist in the adult kidney across many different vertebrate species, such as fish (Figure 5)[11]. In lower vertebrates, renal regeneration and structural remodeling occurs in response to injury due to the presence of potent renal progenitors. Interestingly, the presence of these progenitors can result in the formation of new nephrons during adult growth as well as during regeneration, in a process termed neonephrogenesis[4]. In stark contrast, mammals cease the generation of new nephrons at birth or shortly after[9]. While we have previously discussed observations that have led the hypothesis that renal progenitors may exist in the adult mammalian kidney, there are alternative views including the generation of scattered progenitors in response to injury[31]. Despite such controversies, it is well accepted that the mammalian kidney responds to resection with compensatory glomerular and tubular hypertrophy[32].


Renal progenitors: Roles in kidney disease and regeneration
Neonephrogenesis in the adult zebrafish. Adult zebrafish possess the unique ability to generate new nephrons during adulthood. Neonephrogenesis in zebrafish mimics the cellular dynamics of nephrogenesis during mammalian kidney development. Renal progenitors cluster to create a PTA. This aggregate changes morphology as it first forms a comma-shape followed by an S-shape. The SSB differentiates into specific cell types that comprise the blood filter and tubules of a mature nephron. CD: Collecting duct; G: Glomerulus; PTA: Pre-tubular aggregate; CSB: Comma-shaped body; SSB: S-shaped body.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120241&req=5

Figure 5: Neonephrogenesis in the adult zebrafish. Adult zebrafish possess the unique ability to generate new nephrons during adulthood. Neonephrogenesis in zebrafish mimics the cellular dynamics of nephrogenesis during mammalian kidney development. Renal progenitors cluster to create a PTA. This aggregate changes morphology as it first forms a comma-shape followed by an S-shape. The SSB differentiates into specific cell types that comprise the blood filter and tubules of a mature nephron. CD: Collecting duct; G: Glomerulus; PTA: Pre-tubular aggregate; CSB: Comma-shaped body; SSB: S-shaped body.
Mentions: Renal progenitors exist in the adult kidney across many different vertebrate species, such as fish (Figure 5)[11]. In lower vertebrates, renal regeneration and structural remodeling occurs in response to injury due to the presence of potent renal progenitors. Interestingly, the presence of these progenitors can result in the formation of new nephrons during adult growth as well as during regeneration, in a process termed neonephrogenesis[4]. In stark contrast, mammals cease the generation of new nephrons at birth or shortly after[9]. While we have previously discussed observations that have led the hypothesis that renal progenitors may exist in the adult mammalian kidney, there are alternative views including the generation of scattered progenitors in response to injury[31]. Despite such controversies, it is well accepted that the mammalian kidney responds to resection with compensatory glomerular and tubular hypertrophy[32].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Kidney disease is a devastating condition that affects millions of people worldwide, and its prevalence is predicted to significantly increase. The kidney is a complex organ encompassing many diverse cell types organized in a elaborate tissue architecture, making regeneration a challenging feat. In recent years, there has been a surge in the field of stem cell research to develop regenerative therapies for various organ systems. Here, we review some recent progressions in characterizing the role of renal progenitors in development, regeneration, and kidney disease in mammals. We also discuss how the zebrafish provides a unique experimental animal model that can provide a greater molecular and genetic understanding of renal progenitors, which may contribute to the development of potential regenerative therapies for human renal afflictions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus