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Comparison of Open-Cell Stent and Closed-Cell Stent for Treatment of Central Vein Stenosis or Occlusion in Hemodialysis Patients

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ABSTRACT

Background: Central vein stenosis or occlusion is a common complication that can lead to significant morbidity and dysfunction of access in the hemodialysis patient. More lesions can develop over time, and preserving access becomes a challenge as life expectancy of the hemodialysis patient increases.

Objectives: The goal was to compare long-term results and determine the outcomes of open-cell stent versus closed-cell stent for central vein stenosis or occlusion in hemodialysis patients.

Patients and methods: From 1997 to 2015, in 401 hemodialysis patients, stent placement for central vein stenosis or occlusion was performed if balloon angioplasty was unsatisfactory, due to elastic recoil or occurrence of restenosis within 3 months. When thrombus was present, primary stenting was performed. A total of 257 open-cell stents and 144 closed-cell stents were used. Angiographic findings including lesion site, central vein stenosis or occlusion, and presence of thrombosis and complication were evaluated. Primary patency rate and mean patency rate of the stent were compared between two stent groups by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis.

Results: For the open-cell stent group, 159 patients were diagnosed as central vein stenosis and 98 were occlusion. For the closed-cell stent group, 78 were stenosis and 66 were occlusion. There were two complications for central migration and two for procedure-related vein rupture. Open-cell stents and closed-cell stents had mean patency rates of 10.9 ± 0.80 months and 8.5 ± 10.87 months, respectively (P = 0.002).

Conclusion: The open-cell stent is effective and its performance is higher than that obtained with the closed-cell stent for treating central vein stenosis or occlusion in hemodialysis patients.

No MeSH data available.


Examples of an open-cell stent (A) and a closed-cell stent (B)
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fig38065: Examples of an open-cell stent (A) and a closed-cell stent (B)

Mentions: A stent can be classified as a closed-cell stent or an open-cell stent, depending on the density of struts (15). Closed-cell stents are characterized by small free cell areas between struts, whereas open-cell stents have larger uncovered gaps (Figure 3) (23). Closed-cell stents with a small cell size have a dense, metallic mesh and therefore, may provide more effective plaque coverage and reduce the risk of particle embolization (16). However, closed-cell stents are known to be less flexible and more rigid and are more likely to be used in straight morphologies (16). In contrast, open-cell stents are flexible; kinked lesions are ideally treated with these stents (16).


Comparison of Open-Cell Stent and Closed-Cell Stent for Treatment of Central Vein Stenosis or Occlusion in Hemodialysis Patients
Examples of an open-cell stent (A) and a closed-cell stent (B)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120236&req=5

fig38065: Examples of an open-cell stent (A) and a closed-cell stent (B)
Mentions: A stent can be classified as a closed-cell stent or an open-cell stent, depending on the density of struts (15). Closed-cell stents are characterized by small free cell areas between struts, whereas open-cell stents have larger uncovered gaps (Figure 3) (23). Closed-cell stents with a small cell size have a dense, metallic mesh and therefore, may provide more effective plaque coverage and reduce the risk of particle embolization (16). However, closed-cell stents are known to be less flexible and more rigid and are more likely to be used in straight morphologies (16). In contrast, open-cell stents are flexible; kinked lesions are ideally treated with these stents (16).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Central vein stenosis or occlusion is a common complication that can lead to significant morbidity and dysfunction of access in the hemodialysis patient. More lesions can develop over time, and preserving access becomes a challenge as life expectancy of the hemodialysis patient increases.

Objectives: The goal was to compare long-term results and determine the outcomes of open-cell stent versus closed-cell stent for central vein stenosis or occlusion in hemodialysis patients.

Patients and methods: From 1997 to 2015, in 401 hemodialysis patients, stent placement for central vein stenosis or occlusion was performed if balloon angioplasty was unsatisfactory, due to elastic recoil or occurrence of restenosis within 3 months. When thrombus was present, primary stenting was performed. A total of 257 open-cell stents and 144 closed-cell stents were used. Angiographic findings including lesion site, central vein stenosis or occlusion, and presence of thrombosis and complication were evaluated. Primary patency rate and mean patency rate of the stent were compared between two stent groups by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis.

Results: For the open-cell stent group, 159 patients were diagnosed as central vein stenosis and 98 were occlusion. For the closed-cell stent group, 78 were stenosis and 66 were occlusion. There were two complications for central migration and two for procedure-related vein rupture. Open-cell stents and closed-cell stents had mean patency rates of 10.9 ± 0.80 months and 8.5 ± 10.87 months, respectively (P = 0.002).

Conclusion: The open-cell stent is effective and its performance is higher than that obtained with the closed-cell stent for treating central vein stenosis or occlusion in hemodialysis patients.

No MeSH data available.