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Xiphoidectomy: A Surgical Intervention for an Underdocumented Disorder

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ABSTRACT

Two patients who presented with nonspecific thoracic and upper abdominal symptoms and tenderness of the xiphoid process are discussed. Both patients had undergone extensive examinations, but no source for their symptoms could be found. Plain chest radiographs revealed an anterior displacement of the xiphoid process in both patients. Physical examination confirmed this to be the primary source of discomfort. Anterior displacement of the xiphoid process may be the result of significant weight gain. Repeated trauma of the afflicted area, unaccustomed heavy lifting, exercise, and perichondritis are, amongst other causes, believed to contribute to the development of xiphodynia. Both patients were treated by performing a xiphoidectomy, resulting in disappearance of the symptoms.

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Computerized tomography of xiphoid process protrusion.
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fig2: Computerized tomography of xiphoid process protrusion.

Mentions: A 55-year-old male was referred to our clinic by his General Practitioner regarding complaints of his xiphoid process. Apart from routine physical examination no further analysis had been performed by the general practitioner. The patient had been overweight (BMI 30.6 kg/m2) but had recently, in an effort to live a healthier life, lost 17 kg of bodyweight, which resulted in a BMI of 25.6 kg/m2. However, since the weight loss the patient experienced a pain sensation of the xiphoid process. In his daily life, he works as a mechanic who operates heavy machinery and lifts heavy items. Ever since his weight loss he noticed that his xiphoid process was protruding and lifting items started to get bothersome and painful. In this case a computerized tomography (CT) was available (Figure 2). This chest CT was made in the process of analysing his symptoms. The images show a protruding xyphoid process. A xiphoidectomy was performed. Postoperatively the patient reported no more pain and remained symptom-free during thirty months of follow-up.


Xiphoidectomy: A Surgical Intervention for an Underdocumented Disorder
Computerized tomography of xiphoid process protrusion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120187&req=5

fig2: Computerized tomography of xiphoid process protrusion.
Mentions: A 55-year-old male was referred to our clinic by his General Practitioner regarding complaints of his xiphoid process. Apart from routine physical examination no further analysis had been performed by the general practitioner. The patient had been overweight (BMI 30.6 kg/m2) but had recently, in an effort to live a healthier life, lost 17 kg of bodyweight, which resulted in a BMI of 25.6 kg/m2. However, since the weight loss the patient experienced a pain sensation of the xiphoid process. In his daily life, he works as a mechanic who operates heavy machinery and lifts heavy items. Ever since his weight loss he noticed that his xiphoid process was protruding and lifting items started to get bothersome and painful. In this case a computerized tomography (CT) was available (Figure 2). This chest CT was made in the process of analysing his symptoms. The images show a protruding xyphoid process. A xiphoidectomy was performed. Postoperatively the patient reported no more pain and remained symptom-free during thirty months of follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Two patients who presented with nonspecific thoracic and upper abdominal symptoms and tenderness of the xiphoid process are discussed. Both patients had undergone extensive examinations, but no source for their symptoms could be found. Plain chest radiographs revealed an anterior displacement of the xiphoid process in both patients. Physical examination confirmed this to be the primary source of discomfort. Anterior displacement of the xiphoid process may be the result of significant weight gain. Repeated trauma of the afflicted area, unaccustomed heavy lifting, exercise, and perichondritis are, amongst other causes, believed to contribute to the development of xiphodynia. Both patients were treated by performing a xiphoidectomy, resulting in disappearance of the symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus