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Postinsertional Cable Movements of Cochlear Implant Electrodes and Their Effects on Intracochlear Pressure

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ABSTRACT

Introduction. To achieve a functional atraumatic cochlear implantation, intracochlear pressure changes during the procedure should be minimized. Postinsertional cable movements are assumed to induce intracochlear pressure changes. The aim of this study was to observe intracochlear pressure changes due to postinsertional cable movements. Materials and Methods. Intracochlear pressure changes were recorded in a cochlear model with a micro-pressure sensor positioned in the apical region of the cochlea model to follow the maximum amplitude and pressure gain velocity in intracochlear pressure. A temporal bone mastoid cavity was attached to the model to simulate cable positioning. The compared conditions were (1) touching the unsealed electrode, (2) touching the sealed electrode, (3) cable storage with an unfixed cable, and (4) cable storage with a fixed cable. Results. We found statistically significant differences in the occurrence of maximum amplitude and pressure gain velocity in intracochlear pressure changes under the compared conditions. Comparing the cable storage conditions, a cable fixed mode offers significantly lower maximum pressure amplitude and pressure gain velocity than the nonfixed mode. Conclusion. Postinsertional cable movement led to a significant pressure transfer into the cochlea. Before positioning the electrode cable in the mastoid cavity, fixation of the cable is recommended.

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Exemplary pressure changes for the conditions (a) unsealed, (b) sealed, (c) unfixed, and (d) fixed.
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fig1: Exemplary pressure changes for the conditions (a) unsealed, (b) sealed, (c) unfixed, and (d) fixed.

Mentions: Exemplary presentations of the ICP related to the different procedures are presented in Figures 1(a), 1(b), 1(c), and 1(d).


Postinsertional Cable Movements of Cochlear Implant Electrodes and Their Effects on Intracochlear Pressure
Exemplary pressure changes for the conditions (a) unsealed, (b) sealed, (c) unfixed, and (d) fixed.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120182&req=5

fig1: Exemplary pressure changes for the conditions (a) unsealed, (b) sealed, (c) unfixed, and (d) fixed.
Mentions: Exemplary presentations of the ICP related to the different procedures are presented in Figures 1(a), 1(b), 1(c), and 1(d).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction. To achieve a functional atraumatic cochlear implantation, intracochlear pressure changes during the procedure should be minimized. Postinsertional cable movements are assumed to induce intracochlear pressure changes. The aim of this study was to observe intracochlear pressure changes due to postinsertional cable movements. Materials and Methods. Intracochlear pressure changes were recorded in a cochlear model with a micro-pressure sensor positioned in the apical region of the cochlea model to follow the maximum amplitude and pressure gain velocity in intracochlear pressure. A temporal bone mastoid cavity was attached to the model to simulate cable positioning. The compared conditions were (1) touching the unsealed electrode, (2) touching the sealed electrode, (3) cable storage with an unfixed cable, and (4) cable storage with a fixed cable. Results. We found statistically significant differences in the occurrence of maximum amplitude and pressure gain velocity in intracochlear pressure changes under the compared conditions. Comparing the cable storage conditions, a cable fixed mode offers significantly lower maximum pressure amplitude and pressure gain velocity than the nonfixed mode. Conclusion. Postinsertional cable movement led to a significant pressure transfer into the cochlea. Before positioning the electrode cable in the mastoid cavity, fixation of the cable is recommended.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus